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State Rep. Mary Franson wants to repost legal ban on employers' demand for passwords

State Rep. Mary Franson tried last year to pass legislation that would keep employers from demanding that their workers turn over their passwords to social media like Facebook and Twitter.

Franson is trying again this year.

In an interview with House Public Information Services, Franson, a Republican from Alexandria, says it's harder for young people to find employment these days, and that items they post on social media sites shouldn't be used against them in job searches.

"We have youth that ... do not seem to think that what they put out on Twitter and they put out on Facebook or another social media outlet, that it's not going affect their job search down the road. Children, high school, even college kids, they are not looking at their future job employers."

She said there's bipartisan support for the bill, because "we all view social media and we can all come together and agree that this practice of asking for passwords is egregious and should not be allowed."

And she said: "I truly don't believe that your social media presence is indicative of the person you are."

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Comments (3)

I find it hard to believe

that Rep. Franson and I see eye to eye on an issue, but there we are.

One does not grant a prospective employer access to only one's own information when handing over a password. On Facebook, for example, one grants access to everything any friend has made available to you, without that friend's permission. We've seen too many invasions of privacy (or worse) by public employees recently to have any reason to believe that the private sector would handle this information any more responsibly.

I too had to double check.

I too had to double check. Mary Franson is doing something to help people vs. helping corporations? What's next, dogs will stop chasing squirrels?

Let's be real

Who would want to work for a company that would ask for your social media passwords? A place that would ask for that is not a place you want to work. Simple refuse. If they insist, walk away. You may need a job, but how much abuse do you want to accept to get one? If they will violate your privacy in that way, you know they won't respect you in other ways either.