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Minneapolis approves settlement with departing Regulatory Services director

One of many groups of firefighters hold an annual "Fill the Boot" fundraiser
Photo courtesy of Minneapolis Firefighters Union
One of many groups of firefighters, shown at the 2011 gathering, hold an annual "Fill the Boot" fundraiser to battle muscular dystrophy.

Without discussion, the Minneapolis City Council signed off today on a $70,000 settlement with the departing director of Regulatory Services, Gregory Stubbs, who was hired last November.

The city will pay $70,729  to Stubbs, who oversaw a department of 289 workers who are responsible for inspections, building permits, code enforcement and animal control.

The settlement package includes $64,769, the equivalent of six months of severance, six months of COBRA health insurance payments and $6,000 for relocation expenses. Stubbs moved here from Florida to take the job.

The only explanation of his departure was an agenda item under New Business, which states:  “The city desires to sever the employment and allow the employee to resign his position. Mr. Stubbs has agreed.”

Only one council member voted against the settlement.

“I didn’t agree to hire Mr. Stubbs,” said Council Member Gary Schiff after the meeting. “I will not be responsible for the financial cost of getting rid of him.”

During his budget address Wednesday, Mayor R.T. Rybak announced a reorganization of Regulatory Services that will move business licensing and review to Community Planning and Economic Development. The reorganization also would move Environmental Management from Regulatory Services to the Health Department.

Rybak said the reorganization will save the city $300,000 to $400,000 in salaries for upper-level management.

‘Fill the Boot’

Look for the firefighters standing in an intersection near you next month as part of the annual “Fill the Boot” fundraiser. The Sept. 5-7 event is sponsored by the International Association of Fire Fighters, with proceeds going to the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

“You’ll see our firefighters holding their boots out to try and raise money,” said Council President Barb Johnson.

“Over a million people drive past us,” said Mark Lakosky, president of the Minneapolis Firefighters Union. He noted that those collecting money are doing so within their immediate response area and are not compromising the safety of residents.

“We take over Camp Courage for a week every summer,” he said. During that time, children and teens with muscular dystrophy visit the camp, which is staffed with volunteers from the Fire Department.

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