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Paul Brandon

Mankato, MN
Commenter for
6 years 48 weeks

Recent Comments

Posted on 11/04/14 at 05:58 pm in response to Does the field of social psychology have an anti-conservative bias?

a dead horse.

Democrats don't deny that some Muslims are terrorists, just that all of them are, or that something about Islam makes people automatically terrorists (do YOU know any Muslims?).

Many students of political reform would say that Socialism can't be said to have failed since it has never been tried on any but a very small scale (the early Kibbutzes, the Oneida community). Certainly Stalin and Mao were not socialists in any sense that Marx or Bernard Shaw would have...

Posted on 11/04/14 at 06:01 pm in response to Does the field of social psychology have an anti-conservative bias?

"Extraordinary claims require extraordinary support".
My own field was behavioral experimental psychology, not social, but we all started with the same basic scientific training.
For anyone who knows the literature in their field, a claim that is inconsistent with what is known in that field is going to take more support than one that is consistent with the known science.

Posted on 11/03/14 at 10:31 am in response to Unpacking the Strib's teacher-eval story — and a puzzling MPS response

also in cities with the poorest students?

Posted on 11/04/14 at 08:20 pm in response to Unpacking the Strib's teacher-eval story — and a puzzling MPS response

that after three years teaching has little effect on teaching effectiveness.
And while standardized test scores are a limited measure of teaching effectiveness, they still are the best we have. Too little is known (as opposed to believed) about what observable actions constitute effective teaching. The bottom line is still whether students learn, and that can be tested.

And claiming that there are some inherently unobservable effects that are the really important outcomes of...

Posted on 11/03/14 at 10:26 am in response to The big question: Is our election system working?

The candidates favored by the plurality of the voters do not always get elected:
1. Bush v. Gore.
2. House of Representatives vs. the will of the people (a majority of the voters favored Democratic candidates).

Posted on 11/04/14 at 09:43 am in response to The big question: Is our election system working?

The genius (if you wish) of our system is that it is inherently conservative (in the true, not reactionary sense). It makes change difficult. Historically, whichever party is in the minority has taken advantage of this to prevent the majority from enacting all of its agenda with narrow majorities.
This is one way in which we have regained some of the checks of a parliamentary system that were lost with the development of a two party system.

Posted on 11/04/14 at 09:45 am in response to The big question: Is our election system working?

about recycled conservative talking points.
Einstein once defined foolishness as asking the same question twice and expecting a different answer.
Ask standard questions and you will get standard answers.

Posted on 11/01/14 at 10:17 am in response to Reaching tenure as a teacher: More than a voilà moment

is a substitute for paying adequate salaries.
The job security granted by tenure makes the job attractive even though better paying private sector jobs are available; particularly for people with STEM backgrounds.

trick or treat?
It's a bit early for April Fools.

Posted on 10/31/14 at 10:15 am in response to T-Wolves two-game takeaway: they will not be awful

1. Will the Wolves win more this year than last year?
....probably not.
.
2. Will the Wolves win more two years from now than if they had not made major changes?
....probably yes.
.
Call it rebuilding or whatever you want, but the Wolves success rests on a lot of first and second year players.