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Richard Schulze

Walker, MN
Commenter for
5 years 40 weeks

Recent Comments

Posted on 11/08/12 at 05:59 pm in response to Margaret Anderson Kelliher, Vin Weber assess the vote

The success of liberal initiatives, and the defeat of socially conservative senate Tea Party candidates and Mitt Romney suggest a movement towards a more socially liberal country. Historically, the last great economic dislocation in the 1930s also led to rapid social liberalization as conservatives, exposed as unable to manage a successful economy, lost their moral sway as well. This seems to be happening in the wake of today's economic crisis. The social compact allows the establishment to...

Posted on 11/09/12 at 05:27 pm in response to Margaret Anderson Kelliher, Vin Weber assess the vote

Very persuasive Mr. Haas.

On a similar note, I think that if a strong leader moves the Republican party just a little, the Tea Party will self-deport itself. The Republicans adopted the Tea Party when they were down in 2009 and the Tea Party looked like a way to win. Now that the Tea Party looks like a way to lose, I don't think they'll be tolerated for long. Republicans are nothing if not ruthless.

The mirror never lies.

Posted on 11/07/12 at 08:20 pm in response to A mandate or a rejection? Lessons from the 2012 elections

Did the GOP notice how Mr. Romney started his ascent in the polls while attempting to move to the center?

The job they get elected for is to best serve the people they represent by advancing the principles and ideas they were elected for through compromise and hard decisions.

The young, educated elite who create jobs and lead opinion trends are socially liberal and fiscally conservative. They support useful benefits and efficient government but not deficits or bureaucracy. The boomers, who have become less socially liberal with age and have always been fiscally profligate, are electorally important today but a diminishing breed. Getting in front of the libertarian trend will require adjustment by both parties, the Republicans most obviously, but the Democrats too...

Posted on 10/24/12 at 07:26 pm in response to China-bashing rhetoric like Romney's is counterproductive

Dear China,

Cut us a little slack. In most countries in the world (including you), the imperialistic hegemon, i.e. the US, is the default bogeyman upon whom to blame the country's woes. The US rarely complains about the aspersions cast its way, or even notices. So please spare a brief moment of sympathy for the US. Who is our default bogeyman? True, Americans also blame the US government, but you can't do that if you are the government, or plan to run it. So we need a go-to country on...

Posted on 10/23/12 at 05:06 pm in response to Foreign policy debate: Turns out Romney’s a peacenik

Conservatives have no where to go and Romney is smart enough to know he owes them nothing.

Posted on 10/19/12 at 07:58 pm in response to Monday’s debate: Watch for what Romney says about Europe

Would the American consulate in Benghazi have been less likely to be attacked if America had supported Israeli efforts to expand its settlements on the West Bank? How about if we had been more aggressive over the past two years in explicitly threatening to bomb Iran? Would America's standing in the Arab world be higher had we been more enthusiastically pro-Israel? It's a theory.

Posted on 10/18/12 at 07:25 pm in response to A solid debate ‘win’ for Obama

I am struck by how much each of these guys is a centrist at heart, albeit with different philosophical leanings. Were no power at stake and no parties involved, I'm sure the two of them if asked could arrive at a consensus on deficit reduction and entitlement reform. There's not much distance between them. The polarization is between the parties, not the candidates. Both parties' ideologues insist that we stand on principle, no matter what the cost.