Nonprofit, nonpartisan journalism. Supported by readers.

Donate
Topics

Book club break-ups: It’s not me, it’s them

Reasons for leaving a book club are often circumstantial — a new job, an expanding family, a move to another city. Once in a while, however, dumping your book group is personal.

Reasons for leaving a book club are often circumstantial — a new job, an expanding family, a move to another city.

Once in a while, however, dumping your book group is personal: obnoxious members grate your nerves, there’s more drunken blather than book discussion, a falling-out among members makes meetings tense and uncomfortable. 

Perhaps you just thought a book group sounded like fun and it turned out to be a bore or a chore.

I want to hear about your book club quarrels. If you have ever left a book club, divulge why you chose to find a new club. 

I’m not interested in amicable departures. I want the juicy gossip, the down low on the bad break-ups. 

If your book club has ever ousted a member for bad behavior — or conversely, if you have ever been asked to leave a book club — tell me about the experience.

Advice on the best way to end a commitment to a book group is also welcome. 

Please email responses to aotto[at]minnpost[dot]com by Wednesday, Nov. 3. 

Stories will be kept anonymous, but kindly include your city or region of residence.

The follow-up piece on book club break-ups — sharing reader experiences and insights — will be posted Friday, Nov. 6.