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Cargill still facing questions, criticism over salmonella

A week after Cargill was forced to recall nearly a million pounds of salmonella-tainted beef, some of which was bound for the National School Lunch Program, the company still faces a stampede of online questions and criticisms.

Cargill still faces a stampede of online questions and criticisms, a week after it was forced to recall nearly a million pounds of salmonella-tainted beef, some of which was bound for the National School Lunch Program.

The Associated Press reports one of the company’s California slaughterhouses was cited by federal inspectors last year on animal-handling violations. Inspectors found employees stunned cows unconcious so they could be dragged down a narrow chute to the kill area.

Those chutes are typically covered in urine and feces, a blogger for Grist emphasizes, and when animals are dragged through them, all that material and bacteria gets caked on the cows and increases the risk for food-borne illnesses.

Meanwhile, the Salmonella Blog wants to know why the company hasn’t been forced to issue a list of retailers that were selling the tainted beef. Meat-eaters in at least three states, California, Colorado and Wyoming, have reported becoming ill.