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Warrior Romney may have miscalculated voters’ longings

Now Mitt Romney is critical of President Obama for his alleged weakness in the face of the attack on our consulate in Libya.

Presidential candidate Mitt Romney is attempting to project a tough image when it comes to foreign policy.
REUTERS/Jim Young

After stumbling through Britain on a recent tour, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney then landed in Israel with bugles sounding and war drums rolling, Iran in his sights. Now he is critical of President Barack Obama for his alleged weakness in the face of the attack on our consulate in Libya.

As with former President George W. Bush, who sounded the trumpets for the invasion of Iraq, Romney would, of course, be safe in Washington, D.C., while others serve on any new battlefield. I suggest we skip new wars with Iran and Libya until we have paid for Iraq and Afghanistan.

It’s obvious Romney wants to prove his manhood before the electorate, perhaps as a way of halting the current slide in his poll numbers. He could have proved it in Vietnam, but he found a way to do his service in southern France. Romney supported the Vietnam War — just not enough to get involved, as he used student deferments and missionary status to stay well away.

Romney’s father, George Romney, originally supported the Vietnam War but changed his mind, claiming the military had actually “brainwashed” him.

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The Romney team and the conservative media seem to think that any disenchantment with Obama means the public longs for the old days when the GOP neocons trashed our economic stability with big tax cuts while embarking on expensive wars.

The GOP may want to start planning for 2016.

Rolf Westgard is a professional member of the Geological Society of America and the American Nuclear Society. He teaches classes on energy for the University of Minnesota’s Lifelong Learning program. His new fall quarter class is “Update on Fukushima and the Iran Nuclear Program.”

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