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SOPA receives bipartisan opposition from delegation

WASHINGTON — After a wave of virtual protests, nearly every member of Minnesota’s U.S. House delegation said they opposed the online piracy bill. Amy Klobuchar and Al Franken said they want a “compromise” solution in the Senate.

WASHINGTON — In a rare showing of bipartisanship, nearly every Minnesotan in the U.S. House of Representatives came out against the Stop Online Piracy Act on Wednesday, the same day website “blackouts” swept across the Internet protesting the legislation.

Sen. Al Franken
MinnPost photo by Jay Weiner
Sen. Al Franken
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Rep. Erik Paulsen
Rep. Erik Paulsen

By the afternoon, Democrat Betty McCollum had come out against the bill and Republicans John Kline, Erik Paulsen and Chip Cravaack had posted messages to Facebook and Twitter announcing their opposition. Spokespeople for Reps. Tim Walz, a Democrat, and Michele Bachmann, a Republican, said they would also oppose the plan, and Rep. Collin Peterson’s office said he was “leaning no.”

“I believe copyright infringement and piracy should be prosecuted to the full extent that the law affords,” Paulsen said in a statement, “but I have deep concerns about the effects of SOPA and therefore cannot support it in its current form.”

Paulsen’s office posted the statement on his Facebook page. By Thursday morning, 177 users had liked it and there were 71 comments, by far the most of any recent update.