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How each of Minnesota’s congressional districts changed with redistricting

See which areas were gained and lost in each of Minnesota’s eight congressional districts.

With the Legislature failing (not even really trying to act), on Tuesday a special judicial panel in Minnesota released the political district boundaries that will be used in the state for the next decade. The lines redrawn by the panel include those for U.S. House Districts, Minnesota Senate Districts and Minnesota House Districts.

To help you see how the lines for Minnesota’s congressional districts have changed, for each district we've overlaid the out line of the old district in purple with the outline of the new district in green. That means areas that are just purple were lost by the district, just green were gained by the district, and areas that are a blend of the two colors (kind of grayish) did not change. You can zoom and pan the maps to focus in on particular areas.

First Congressional District

Currently represented by Rep. Jim Hagedorn (who, so far, doesn’t have any declared opponents), Minnesota’s First Congressional District gained Goodhue and Wabasha Counties, which were formerly part of the Second District. In exchange for gaining those areas, it gave Le Sueur County over to the Second District. The First District also lost a section of land on its northwestern edge (to the north and east of Windom) which was added to the Seventh District.

Areas in purple were LOST. Areas in green were GAINED. Areas where the colors overlap did not change.

Second Congressional District

The closely watched Second Congressional District is currently represented by Rep. Angie Craig, and is a suburban swing district. As noted above, the Second District lost Goodhue and Wabasha counties, which are now part of the First District. Le Sueur County was added. The Second District also expanded slightly northward, claiming southern parts of Woodbury. The Second District is on the National Republican Congressional Committee’s short list of target districts for the 2022 midterm election.

Areas in purple were LOST. Areas in green were GAINED. Areas where the colors overlap did not change.

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Third Congressional District

Another district on the NRCC’s shortlist is Minnesota’s Third Congressional District, represented by DFL Rep. Dean Phillips. In this round of redistricting, the Third District lost its portion of Carver County, which was added to the Sixth District, and gained the city of Hopkins and parts of Edina, which had been part of the Fifth District, represented by Rep. Ilhan Omar. The Third District also added the City of Anoka from the Sixth District. Like Minnesota’s Fourth and Fifth Congressional Districts, the Third District shrank geographically to accommodate urban population growth.

Areas in purple were LOST. Areas in green were GAINED. Areas where the colors overlap did not change.

Fourth Congressional District

Minnesota's Fourth Congressional District, represented by Rep. Betty McCollum and home to St. Paul and many of the city’s eastern suburbs, lost a southern section of Woodbury (moved to the Second District) and a small area of land north of Stillwater, now part of the massive Eighth District. McCollum, a Democrat, has held the district since 2001.

Areas in purple were LOST. Areas in green were GAINED. Areas where the colors overlap did not change.

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Fifth Congressional District

Perhaps the most reliably blue district in the state, Minnesota’s Fifth Congressional District covers Minneapolis and some surrounding suburbs. The only changes to the district were losing Hopkins and part of Edina to the Third District.

Areas in purple were LOST. Areas in green were GAINED. Areas where the colors overlap did not change.

Sixth Congressional District

Minnesota’s Sixth District has been a reliable Republican stronghold over the past decade, represented first by Rep. Michele Bachmann and later Rep. Tom Emmer, after Bachmann’s retirement. The district lost some of its western portions over to the Seventh District, and a chunk on its easern edge to the Eighth District, as well as the city of Anoka, which is now part of the Third District. It gained a large part of Carver county in the southwest metro, including Chanhassen and communities south of Lake Minnetonka. Previously, those were part of the Third District.

Areas in purple were LOST. Areas in green were GAINED. Areas where the colors overlap did not change.

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Seventh Congressional District

After being held by Democrat Collin Peterson for decades, the Seventh Congressional District was won by Republican Rep. Michelle Fischbach in 2020. Fischbach defeated Peterson with 53.4 percent of votes to Peterson’s 39.9 percent. The Seventh District lost a fairly large geographic area in north-central Minnesota, including the Northwest Angle, to the Eighth District. But it gained in central Minnesota, including Wadena County and a southern portion of Hubbard County.

Areas in purple were LOST. Areas in green were GAINED. Areas where the colors overlap did not change.

Eighth Congressional District

Minnesota’s Eighth Congressional District, represented by Republican Rep. Pete Stauber, now stretches from the northernmost point of Minnesota — the Northwest Angle, which is connected by land only to Canada — all the way down to Hugo in the Twin Cities exurbs. It gained the former area of land from the Seventh District and the latter from the Sixth and Fourth Districts. Some areas on its western edges were transferred over to the Seventh District.

Areas in purple were LOST. Areas in green were GAINED. Areas where the colors overlap did not change.