The presidential campaign ads you’re missing

Thanks to Electoral College math, neither of the presidential campaigns will spend much money advertising in Minnesota. So, in case you’d like to see what the swing states are seeing, here are a couple of the most recent ads, one from each side (and from the actual campaigns, not the SuperPACs).

Team Obama is up with a new one today, trashing Mitt Romney’s job creation record as governor of Massachusetts.

And here’s one that Team Romney started airing late last week, which alludes in passing to a series of measures that President Romney would take on “Day One,” and argues beyond the policies, a Romney presidency will immediately give the country a “feeling that our country’s back – back on track.”

Neither of these ads strikes me as likely to swing many votes. I suppose we should view them as part of the process of building a deeper “narrative” that ultimately leads some set of swing voters to the right conclusion. But I’m pretty sick of the “narrative” metaphor. Also “messaging” and “optics.”

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Comments (7)

  1. Submitted by Ray Schoch on 06/04/2012 - 01:54 pm.

    I think it’s in Britain…

    …that campaigns are limited to 6 weeks in length, and there are limitations on the amount of TV advertising – you can advertise in print all you want. Would that we would adopt something similarly sane here, particularly in terms of length. These “early” ads are 20 weeks away from the election.

  2. Submitted by Dennis Tester on 06/04/2012 - 09:10 pm.

    David Axelrod

    was on the TV today talking about the Obama campaign and he said that “virtually none” of their ads are negative ads.

    This is my nominee for the most out-of-touch-with-the-folks ad of the season. Do you think any independent blue collar workers will identify with this lady?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAlnKHctMYs&feature=player_embedded#!

    heh

  3. Submitted by Rachel Kahler on 06/05/2012 - 10:09 am.

    I’m missing ALL the TV ads

    I’ve given up on TV. No real news, no intelligent entertainment, political ads that would have resulted in jailed CEOs if they referred to food and not politics.

  4. Submitted by Peder DeFor on 06/05/2012 - 10:21 am.

    Creepy Tactics

    If being out of the limelight means missing out on things like this: http://www.jsonline.com/news/statepolitics/mailings-that-list-voting-records-set-off-some-neighbors-me5lip3-157049485.html
    then count me in!
    For those who don’t click on the link, a group in WI has been sending out micro-targeted mailings that list voters in neighborhoods and what recent elections they have voted in. Many people are feeling intimidated by this. I certainly would!

    • Submitted by Paul Brandon on 06/05/2012 - 01:35 pm.

      Same old

      This has been standard campaign practice for both parties for years.
      Who votes in what precinct is public information.
      This is how you get out the vote. You cross reference these lists with your list of registered party members to target people who are likely to vote for your candidate, and do you best to get them to vote, including offering to drive them to the polls.
      How you actually vote is known only to you, unless you tell someone.
      Reading the article, a few people found it offensive, but I’m not sure where intimidation comes in. As quoted in the Milwaukee newspaper, the mailings simply urged people to vote and to urge their friends and neighbors to vote. No sanctions of any kind, so I’m not sure how encouraging someone to vote is intimidating.

      When I used to go out doorknocking for a specific candidate and party, I always encouraged people to vote whatever their political preference. Some people made it clear that they considered my knocking on their door an annoyance, but intimidating? And this was certainly more ‘in your face’ than a mailing.

    • Submitted by Paul Brandon on 06/05/2012 - 01:35 pm.

      Same old

      This has been standard campaign practice for both parties for years.
      Who votes in what precinct is public information.
      This is how you get out the vote. You cross reference these lists with your list of registered party members to target people who are likely to vote for your candidate, and do you best to get them to vote, including offering to drive them to the polls.
      How you actually vote is known only to you, unless you tell someone.
      Reading the article, a few people found it offensive, but I’m not sure where intimidation comes in. As quoted in the Milwaukee newspaper, the mailings simply urged people to vote and to urge their friends and neighbors to vote. No sanctions of any kind, so I’m not sure how encouraging someone to vote is intimidating.

      When I used to go out doorknocking for a specific candidate and party, I always encouraged people to vote whatever their political preference. Some people made it clear that they considered my knocking on their door an annoyance, but intimidating? And this was certainly more ‘in your face’ than a mailing.

    • Submitted by Rachel Kahler on 06/05/2012 - 01:51 pm.

      Uh…

      Whether someone votes or not is public record. Those lists have been purchased and used for years without a problem. It sounds like the people complaining are mostly just paranoid.

      For example, someone is suggesting that the list makes her scared because it tells strangers where women live. As if the local phone book or online records don’t already do that…

      In another example, someone says “Anybody can go and vote with my name, and there’s my vote stolen for somebody I might not have voted for. It wasn’t even in an envelope. It’s got my name and address on one side of a piece of paper open to everybody.” (Sheesh! The whole point is that this person DIDN’T vote in 2010…so what are they worried about, even if their logic wasn’t lacking in brilliance.) Again, anyone can get that information online or even in an old-fashioned phone book. There isn’t a social security number or a credit card number or bank account number. For pity’s sake, if people were really in the business of committing mass voting fraud, phone books would still be useful. But, since some people will fall for every scam out there, the voter fraud issue is still a hot button for some people.

      In any case, these people are all concerned that others might find out something that they’ve been able to find out for quite some time. At the same time, these people probably haven’t strained a brain cell on the fact that voter ID could take it a step further–after all, HOW you vote could readily be tracked when you use a provisional ballot.

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