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Man, Swedes really don’t trust Trump. They’re not alone.

The world lost a lot of that confidence when Donald Trump took over from Barack Obama. And the difference is quite stark. 

Stockholm, Sweden
REUTERS/Ints Kalnins

Pew Research Center has just released a survey of opinions of how much confidence people from 37 nations around the world have that the United States will do the right thing in international affairs.

Guess what? The world lost a lot of that confidence when Donald Trump took over from Barack Obama. The difference is quite stark. Here’s the summary paragraph of Pew’s report:

Although he has only been in office a few months, Donald Trump’s presidency has had a major impact on how the world sees the United States. Trump and many of his key policies are broadly unpopular around the globe, and ratings for the U.S. have declined steeply in many nations. According to a new Pew Research Center survey spanning 37 nations, a median of just 22% has confidence in Trump to do the right thing when it comes to international affairs. This stands in contrast to the final years of Barack Obama’s presidency, when a median of 64% expressed confidence in Trump’s predecessor to direct America’s role in the world.

The full report breaks it down by country. The biggest drop in confidence occurred among respondents in Sweden, where 93 percent said they had confidence in Obama — but just 10 percent say the same about the current incumbent, a drop of 83 percentage points. The top five drops were rounded out by Germany and the Netherlands (drop of 75 points); South Korea (minus 71 percentage points) and France (70 percentage points).

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Just two of the 37 countries had more confidence in Trump than they had previously felt for Obama: Russia, where 53 percent of respondents trusted Trump compared 11 percent who said the same about Obama; and Israel, where 56 percent trusted Trump compared to 49 who had trusted Obama.

The interviews with a total of 40,448 respondents in the 37 countries were conducted between Feb. 16 and May 8, 2017. The full report is viewable here.