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Check out Ezra Klein on Texas, climate change, and ‘humanity’s superpower’

Klein begins by talking about the amazingly lame excuse and ignorant analyses coming out of Texas after its energy debacle.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott shown in a photo from 2018.
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott shown in a photo from 2018.
REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

You may have noticed that the always-intelligent Ezra Klein, one of the founders of Vox, is now a New York Times columnist. I pass along two paragraphs, plus an amazing name, from his Thursday column, talking in part about the amazingly lame excuse and ignorant analyses coming out of Texas when their power grid crashed, about trying to “knock the moon from the sky with a Wiffle bat, and about what he calls “humanity’s superpower.”

Talking about the ludicrous excuses offered by Texas’s governor, Klein wrote (the bold-face emphases are mine):

“The state’s Republican leaders immediately blamed renewable energies as the lights flickered off across their communities. ‘This shows how the Green New Deal would be a deadly deal for the United States of America,’ Gov. Greg Abbott told Sean Hannity, going on to say that ‘it just shows that fossil fuel is necessary.’ Abbott was lying — the Green New Deal hasn’t passed, and the largest drop in electricity generation came from frozen natural gas and coal lines, not frozen wind turbines — but fact-checking his statement is like trying to knock the moon from the sky with a Wiffle bat. Climate politics long ago became culture war, and Abbott’s comments were simply stating which side he’s on. Honestly, I preferred Senator Ted Cruz’s impulse to quietly jet off to Cancún.”

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About humanity’s superpower:

“Cooperation is humanity’s superpower, and the way we have enlarged our circle — from kin, to tribes, to religions, to countries, to the world — is miraculous. But the conditions under which that cooperation has taken hold are delicate, and like everything else, part of the biophysical system in which we live. We are changing that system in ways we do not understand and with consequences we cannot predict.”

And the amazing name, of one of those Klein quotes in the piece:

Julian Brave NoiseCat, vice president of policy and strategy at Data for Progress.

Further your affiant sayeth naught.