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EPA provides new indicators of our changing climate

The Trump administration did what it could for four years to bury the ever-increasing evidence and momentum of climate change and the threat it poses to the future of the planet.

This figure shows how annual average temperatures in the contiguous 48 states have changed since 1901.
This figure shows how annual average temperatures in the contiguous 48 states have changed since 1901.
Data source: NOAA

You might not be too surprised to learn this, but the Trump administration did what it could for four years to bury the ever-increasing evidence and momentum of climate change (aka “global warming”) and the threat it poses to the future of the planet.

That’s over now, and the new sheriff in town (aka the Biden administration) thinks we’re entitled to know what our (meaning all of humanity’s) bad habits and our collective lame efforts to curtail said habits have already done and are still doing to the long-term prognosis for preserving a habitable environment.

A pair of Washington Post energy and environment reporters summarizes what the new Biden Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wrote about the retrogression trends, and didn’t shy away from emphasizing the regrettable legacy of the last quadrennium:

For years, Donald Trump and his deputies played down the impact of greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels and delayed the release of an Environmental Protection Agency report detailing climate-related damage. But on Wednesday, the EPA released a detailed and disturbing account of the startling changes that Earth’s warming had on parts of the United States during Trump’s term.

The destruction of year-round permafrost in Alaska, loss of winter ice on the Great Lakes and spike in summer heat waves in U.S. cities all signal that climate change is intensifying, the EPA said in a report released Wednesday. The assessment, which was delayed under the Trump administration for three years, marks the first time the agency has said such changes are being driven at least in part by human-caused global warming.

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Of course, climate change is a global problem requiring global solutions, but, in the study, EPA Administrator Michael Regan warns that average temperatures are actually rising faster in the United States than the global average.

The full Post story, headlined: “U.S. has entered unprecedented climate territory, EPA warns” is viewable here.

If you want to get into the full overview as compiled by EPA’s now-unchained scientists, it’s here.