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Mitt Romney’s aberrant reasonableness

On Sunday, Romney was interviewed on CNN’s State of the Union, and he demonstrated once again his ability to rise above partisanship and give his honest view of important matters.

I’ve never voted for a national Republican ticket in my life, which now encompasses an astonishing (to me, anyway) 13 presidential elections. But before the GOP became the Party of Trump, I often respected the Republican nominees when they merited it, and that included Mitt Romney, the 2012 GOP nominee, and many Republican senators (including Minnesotans like Dave Durenberger) as people of principle. 

Sen. Romney (Utah) is one of the very few prominent members of his party who maintained his dignity and his integrity during the Trump Era. 

Romney even became the first-ever (and still only) senator to vote for conviction in an impeachment trial of a President of his own party. 

On Sunday morning, he was interviewed on CNN’s State of the Union, and he demonstrated once again his ability to rise above partisanship and give his honest, honorable view of important matters.

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Under the questioning of co-anchor Dana Bash, Romney referred to the current Russian government as an “evil regime,” and expressed several reasonable views about how the U.S. should handle the current crisis.

Everything he said in a 17-minute interview about the Russia-Ukraine news made sense to me

I only want to highlight Romney’s latest views as a way of emphasizing that those who sold their reputations so cheaply during the Trump era should have to sit in a corner for a while before any of their views are taken seriously, especially on anything that requires an ethical compass.