Minnesota State coach gets access to his alleged ‘porn videos’

Elizabeth Baier of MPR has the latest on the case of the Minnesota State football coach and his alleged “porn videos.” “A Blue Earth County judge has ordered that prosecutors give a defense attorney access to videos that resulted in child pornography charges against Todd Hoffner, football coach at Minnesota State University Mankato. Until now, Hoffner’s attorney, Jim Fleming, could only review the videos at the Blue Earth County Sheriff’s Department with a deputy present. Fleming says he needs copies of the three videos to prepare his client’s defense.” And what do you think Cotton Mather would say about this case?

Too bad they weren’t selling rain guttersEric Roper of the Strib reports: “[T]o quote Xccent’s recent lawsuit against the city of Minneapolis, ‘rainwater leaked through the roof of the convention center to such an extent that it was literally raining in Xccent’s booth.’ The big [presentation] day was essentially ruined, the company claims. In court filings, the city admitted that the booth probably got wet, but it wasn’t enough water to be a washout. The convention center’s leaky, 23-year-old copper domes are currently undergoing a $4 million to $5 million plastic-shell upgrade to seal convention-goers from the elements. The city has invested more on short-term fixes in the past five years, but convention center executive director Jeff Johnson hopes the new roof will be complete by Oct. 31.” … Or by the time the boat show opens.

They call it “contempt” for a reason. The AP story says: “A federal judge in Minnesota has reinstated the contempt charges for a Somali woman who refused to stand for the court during the first two days of her trial on terror charges. Amina Farah Ali was convicted last year of funneling money to the terror group al-Shabab in Somalia. During the first two days of her trial, she refused to stand 20 times. Chief U.S. District Judge Michael Davis found her in contempt each time and sentenced her to a total of 100 days. But a federal appeals court vacated 19 contempt charges and sent the issue back to Davis to reconsider. Davis ruled Tuesday that Ali was in contempt, but purged her 100-day sentence.” So, in other words, “never mind”?

Collin Peterson’s challenger out in the 7th District likes what Mitt Romney has to say about the 47 percent. Tom Scheck of MPR writes: “Lee Byberg, the Republican candidate in Minnesota’s 7th Congressional District, is embracing Republican Mitt Romney’s comments at a private fundraiser that 47 percent of Americans ‘believe they are victims’ and are entitled to help from the government that permeates their lives. … ‘Romney was merely stating the obvious,’ Byberg said in a statement. He added that he believed any criticism of Romney ‘missed the point.’ ‘The welfare state is not only unsustainable financially, but morally as well. A dependency culture undermines human dignity. Government aid should be limited to temporary support, and for those truly unable to care for themselves. By no stretch of the imagination is that 47 percent of the population,’ Byberg said.”

Elsewhere at MPR, Eric Ringham offers a commentary asking whether we should be concerned about who shot the surreptitious video: “Mother Jones won’t say who leaked the video, but it appears to have been shot by someone who needed to keep his head down and couldn’t afford to be picky about camera angles. And as Obama did four years ago, Romney is accepting responsibility for his comments. But what about the rest of us? Are we willing to accept the responsibility for what we’re helping to create? … If anybody is troubled by the feeling that they’re eavesdropping on what was supposed to be a private meeting, media observers are quick to point out that there is no such thing as a private meeting anymore. Not during a national campaign. The candidates should know better. And sure, they probably should know better. Saying that, though, lets journalists off the hook. Are we really willing to misrepresent ourselves to get a story? Do we have no problem at all with bugging a meeting room? And if we’re willing to do that, what’s to stop us from hacking into somebody’s phone?” Or … why don’t we just confine ourselves to what is real and true?

The Glean

Oh, and what would you like with your strained equivalency? The Strib editorializes on the big sequestration brawl due to consume Congress after the election: “After prodding by Congress, the White House released a report detailing how the $1.2 trillion in automatic spending cuts triggered by the deal and the failure of the congressional debt “supercommittee” would affect key programs just after New Year’s. The agreement passed with bipartisan support by the House and Senate and was signed by the president last summer. … Republicans are on target with their criticism of the Obama administration for not specifying the real-life impact of the cuts before now. But GOP leadership has disingenuously dubbed the deal the “president’s sequester,” and accused Obama of undermining national security with defense cuts. The reality is that both parties and the president supported the deal, and they all had enough details to understand the potential impact. … The question now is not who’s to blame, but what can be done to replace these risky cuts with a more sensible plan?” Really? No mention at all of the primary forces that drove “both sides” to such a ridiculous deal?

We’re No. 1! Adam Belz of the Strib writes: “When you’re talking credit scores, the Twin Cities area is back on top. The metro area retook the No. 1 spot nationwide in a study by the credit bureau Experian after losing that ranking in 2011 for the first time in four years. Last year’s champion, Wausau, Wis., fell to third. The scores, released Tuesday, matter because they reflect the financial health of people in a community and their ability to get loans. Also, the business-credit risk ranking for a city closely tracks consumer-credit scores.” Terrific. Where do I get a 72-month loan on a Bentley?

Five-eighths of an inch is not what the contract called for. Tim Harlow of the Strib reports, “An unexpected 5/8-inch dropoff between the shoulder and newly repaved roadway on an 8-mile stretch of Interstate 35 means crews will be redoing the shoulder and rumble strips to make the surface even. Officials expect the fix to be completed in a couple of weeks. ‘We made a mistake,’ said Kevin Gutknecht, a spokesman for the Minnesota Department of Transportation. ‘It’s a safety issue and we’ll get on it right away’. The contractor was hired to repave the stretch between Hwy. 8 in Forest Lake and Hwy. 95 in North Branch, repair culverts, install guardrails and make other improvements. But the contract did not call for shoulders on both the inside and outside lanes to be upgraded, resulting in the slight dropoff between the new traffic lanes and the shoulders.”

“Decent.” That’s the DNR’s view of this year’s duck-hunting season. Doug Smith in the Strib says: “State duck stamp sales totaled 46,001 last week, compared to 44,479 for the same period last year. And youth small game license sales with federal Harvest Information Program (HIP) certification — needed to hunt waterfowl — totaled 7,194 this year, compared to 5,879. Meanwhile, DNR officials expect hunters to find ducks on Saturday — the earliest duck opener since the 1940s —because wood ducks and teal, early migrants, should still be abundant. ‘A pile of ducks are coming down from Canada and they are going to be more concentrated this year because of less water across the landscape,’ said Steve Cordts, the DNR’s waterfowl specialist. ‘Somewhere someone is going to have the best duck hunting they’ve ever had.’ ” Is “ a pile of ducks” like “a murder of crows”?

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Comments (1)

  1. Submitted by Logan Foreman on 09/19/2012 - 05:09 pm.

    I’m sure that Byberg means

    Crop subsidies, taxpayer payments for crop insurance and other ethanol payments as forms of dependency also.

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