St. Paul cops reopen archdiocesan case on alleged child porn

Based largely on the reporting of MPR, the St. Paul cops are taking another look at the archdiocese and how it handled allegations of kiddie porn. Madeleine Baran, Tom Scheck and Mike Cronin say: “St. Paul police have reopened the investigation into the potential possession of child pornography by the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis and one of its priests, a spokesman announced Tuesday afternoon. Police had closed the case looking into allegations of child pornography found on computer files once belonging to the Rev. Jonathan Shelley for lack of evidence. … On Friday and Monday, MPR News published details of an investigation that revealed that two archbishops and at least two vicars general sat on Shelley’s pornography collection for about eight years and never informed the police nor followed Vatican procedures, as required by civil and canon law. Memos among archdiocesan officials describe that pornography collection as containing images of boys.”

You don’t see much actual consumer reporting … But Liz Collin at WCCO-TV says: “Pricing problems WCCO-TV uncovered at Minnesota’s largest drugstore chain will likely have you looking a lot closer at your receipts. Walgreens is accused of overcharging customers all across the country. One state is already suing over the same problem. … we bought 28 items that had the wrong tags and were overcharged for everything except one item. We were charged $10 more for protein powder, $23 more for joint care, and for 14 items where you had to buy two to get the deal, we were charged full price for all of them. All together the mistakes had us paying $95.64 more than we should have been charged.”

The Strib editorial board turns its attention to homelessness, saying: “[E]vidence of an improving economy is harder to see at ground level in places where homeless people spend their days and nights. Homelessness remains a visible problem. Documenting the extent of that problem has been the work of the research arm of the St. Paul-based Wilder Foundation at three-year intervals since 1991. Its latest analysis, based on a count taken on Oct. 25, 2012, was released this week. It confirmed the impression one acquires on Minnesota streets: Homelessness did not decline as the economy improved between 2009 and 2012. To the contrary, it grew by 6 percent.”

Oh, wait. I thought we were guaranteed they’d win the Super Bowl … Vikings.com is telling excited fans, “Following Tuesday’s ownership meetings in Washington, D.C., the NFL announced Minnesota as one of three finalists (Indianapolis, New Orleans) to serve as the host for Super Bowl 52. The final selection for the location of the February 4, 2018, game will be announced in May 2014. ‘This is a significant first step in bringing the world’s marquee sporting event to Minnesota,’ said Vikings Owner/President Mark Wilf.”

At NFL.com, Dan Hanzus says: “Six cities had put in applications to host the game, including Miami, Dallas and Tampa, Fla. Representatives of the six cities made their pitch during this week’s NFL Fall Meeting in Washington, D.C. The league will choose the host of the game at the NFL Spring Meeting next May. … The Favorite: Minneapolis hasn’t hosted a Super Bowl since 1992. No one has complained about this, mostly because Minneapolis in February isn’t exactly a hotbed for global tourism. Still, the Vikings will have constructed a new stadium by then and the NFL is known to reward cities for such civic endeavors.” I can think of 400 million other ways the NFL could reward us for our “civic endeavor.”

A federal credit default might be a different story …  Jennifer Bjorhus of the Strib says: “There’s no shortage of painful examples of how the federal government shutdown threatens Minnesota, beginning with the estimated 19,000 federal employees in the state who aren’t getting paid. But when personal finance website WalletHub.com cast a cold eye on the debacle, it concluded that Minnesota will be among the states least affected. In a report out Tuesday WalletHub ranked Minnesota No. 48, or nearly dead last, in terms of potential impact because the state doesn’t rely as heavily on federal purse strings as other states. Topping the hurt list at No. 1 is Virginia, with Alaska, Alabama and the District of Columbia following it. Iowa ranked last.”

Apparently he lost Sheldon Adelson’s number … The AP tells us: “Former state Rep. Phil Krinkie has put down a big marker on his congressional campaign in Minnesota’s 6th District. He said Tuesday he has loaned his campaign $300,000, adding to the $40,000 he says he collected from donors since joining the race in July. He is among several Republicans vying to succeed retiring GOP Rep. Michele Bachmann. … After expenses, Krinkie reports having at least $300,000 in the bank. The heating and cooling company owner says he dipped into personal funds to, in his words, ‘do what it takes to succeed.’ ”

The Strib has a new editor. Jon Collins at MPR writes: “Star Tribune senior managing editor Rene Sanchez will take the reins of the newspaper starting Friday, the company announced today. Sanchez said in a statement that he’s honored by the challenge of succeeding former editor Nancy Barnes, who announced last month that she was leaving the Star Tribune to lead the Houston Chronicle. … Sanchez  led a reorganization of the newspaper several years ago. The revamp included greater emphasis on local reporting and digital publishing.”

Did you know there was a “responsibility test” for lawyers? Emily Gurnon of the PiPress says: “A St. Paul attorney has been indefinitely suspended after he failed the professional responsibility part of the state bar exam. David L. McCormick was required to provide proof to the court by Aug. 22 that he had retaken the test after the Supreme Court temporarily suspended him for disciplinary reasons in August 2012. He told the court that he took the exam Aug. 17, 2013, and asked to submit his results by Sept. 17. But the results showed he did not pass the test, according to the order filed by the Supreme Court on Monday. McCormick, 46, has filed a motion asking for more time to retake the test. ‘(He) states that he was ill on the day of the August 2013 exam and that he has registered for the November 2013 exam’, the court said. That request was denied.” If this doesn’t stop, pretty soon there’ll be a prevarication test.

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Comments (7)

  1. Submitted by Pat Berg on 10/09/2013 - 06:15 am.

    Walgreens data collection

    I stopped shopping at Walgreens when they instituted their “If you want the sale price you have to use this card that lets us collect data on your private shopping habits” (yes – even if you pay with cash).

    However, back when I did shop there, I routinely caught them charging me full price on sale items.

    Privacy-stealing AND price-gouging! What a deal!

    • Submitted by Steve Titterud on 10/09/2013 - 08:40 am.

      Well, they DID promise a two-for-one…

      …it just wasn’t the twofer they promised !!

      The grocery stores are doing the same. It’s a good idea to purchase a limited number of things so you can specifically remember the prices of everything in your shopping cart – in self defense !!

  2. Submitted by Ray Schoch on 10/09/2013 - 07:30 am.

    Shop elsewhere

    Since it was recommended by the doctor as part of a surgery-recovery regimen over an extended period a few years back, I comparison-shopped Polysporin ointment. The Walgreens price per ounce was 60% higher than another convenience drug store chain, nearly 100% higher than my local supermarket pharmacy, more than twice as high as the nearest Walmart, and about 250% of the per-ounce price on Amazon.com.

    Add in Pat Berg’s litany of complaints, and I’d say there’s no reason to shop there.

  3. Submitted by Jackson Cage on 10/09/2013 - 08:07 am.

    Krinkie’s smart

    He knows it doesn’t matter how much of his personal $$ he spends, since the End of Days is upon us. But I hope he’s right. Between the Mayans and a host of others, I think I’ve been through the end of the world at least a dozen times.

  4. Submitted by Paul Scott on 10/09/2013 - 10:14 am.

    Low hanging fruit

    Going after cashier mistakes and overcharging at the drugstore seems like low hanging fruit. Protein powder? Joint care? Maybe they could look into all of the dubious goods they were being overcharged for in the first place.

    • Submitted by Pat Berg on 10/09/2013 - 10:52 pm.

      Low-hanging fruit or not . . . . . . .

      Multiply all those “insignificant” overcharges by the massive number of transactions occurring in all the Walgreens stores all around the country every day and the total amount of money the company is pocketing is no longer so insignificant.

      “Low hanging fruit” or not, it’s money that belongs back in the customers’ pockets, not Walgreens’ bottom line.

  5. Submitted by Fluffy Rabinowitz on 10/09/2013 - 05:50 pm.

    Sanchez

    He was a safe choice for editor, but not a creative one. Hopefully, Renee’s tirades, will be monitored closely. Gillespie has great people skills and would have been a much better choice!

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