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Superior skydivers survive crash, head for ‘Today’ show

The amazing story of two skydiver planes that crashed in mid-air over Superior, Wis., has gone nationwide. First, in the Duluth News Tribune, Peter Passi writes: “The 11 survivors of a mid-air collision above Superior on Saturday evening took to the sky again Sunday, en route to New York City and a likely appearance Monday morning on national television. They’re set to appear on NBC’s “Today” show and plan to tell the harrowing story of a skydiving outing gone wrong. They may also share footage of the events shot via helmet-mounted video cameras — cameras that captured the frantic seconds as two small planes collided at 12,000 feet. ‘For all 11 of us to walk away from something like that relatively unscathed is a minor miracle,’ said Dan Chandler, 31, one of the nine skydivers who — along with two pilots — survived as one plane broke apart and plummeted to the ground, and the other limped back to Richard I. Bong Memorial Airport with a damaged prop.”

Of the event itself, the AP story says: “[Mike] Robinson, an instructor and safety adviser for Skydive Superior, said he and three other skydivers were in a lead plane Saturday, and all four had climbed out onto the step to jump. The plane behind theirs had five skydivers on board, three ready to jump and two still inside the plane. ‘We were just a few seconds away from having a normal skydive when the trail plane came over the top of the lead aircraft and came down on top of it,’ he said. ‘It turned into a big flash fireball and the wing separated’. ‘All of us knew we had a crash. … The wing over our head was gone, so we just left,’ he added. The three skydivers who were on the step of the second plane got knocked off on impact, Robinson said, and the two inside were able to jump. The pilot of Robinson’s plane ejected himself, and the pilot of the second plane landed the aircraft safely at Richard I. Bong Airport, from where it took off.”

Across the harbor in Duluth, the Strib’s Jenna Ross says: “As chairwoman of the Fond du Lac band, [Karen] Diver wrangled 15 funding sources to get [two new housing complexes] built. Gambling revenue from the band’s two casinos was key, she said. Walking around the reservation, west of Cloquet, Minn., Diver pointed out what casino revenues have meant to residents. Their own police, tribal court, clinic, school and scholarship program. In short, she said, ‘self-sufficiency.’ That, she said, is why the band has refused to give up a protracted legal fight with Duluth over whether the city should get a slice of the Fond-du-Luth Casino’s gambling revenue as outlined in long-standing agreements. An offshoot of the dispute will play out this week before the Minnesota Supreme Court.”

Also in Duluth, Mike Creger of the News Tribune writes: “Jim Carlson told people over and over again that he wasn’t the problem. Shut down his store, Last Place on Earth, and synthetic drugs still will stream through Duluth, he said. ‘Now they’re on every corner, and the cops know it,’ Carlson told the News Tribune in August, just a month after his store was closed for what many hope is forever. ‘They’ve made it worse because now it’s everywhere.’ Only it isn’t. That’s what police were saying nearly three months after Carlson’s shop was closed. Soon after his Oct. 7 conviction, police were confident they had a firm handle on the synthetic drug problem.”

Jim Adams and Chris Havens of the Strib report on the chief herself joining in on patrols of the Epic night club. “Extra Minneapolis police officers, including Chief Janeé Harteau, were patrolling downtown streets Sunday night near the Epic nightclub where a man was shot to death in the early morning hours Sunday. Harteau planned to stop at the Epic in the Warehouse District after meeting with officers at their nightly roll call. The 1 a.m. shooting sent patrons spilling out onto the streets, where officers had their hands full keeping crowds under control. The victim, whose name has not been released, was killed inside the club after arguing with another man, who shot him and fled. Police spokeswoman Cyndi Barrington said no motive is known, but police are searching for the man, talking to witnesses and investigating possible gang connections.”

In the PiPress, Leah Smith has a piece about the unique artworks going into each of the Central Corridor LRT’s 18 stops: “As construction crews work to finish the Central Corridor transit line, artists have descended on its stations to give each an identity. At the Victoria Street Station in St. Paul, large portrait terra-cotta tiles will show the ‘Faces of Rondo.’ Stainless-steel spirographs will adorn the East Bank Station on the University of Minnesota’s Minneapolis campus to reflect science and discovery. The 10th Street Station in downtown St. Paul will have glass and stone mosaic reminders of past Winter Carnival ice palaces. All 18 new stops along the light-rail line between the downtowns of St. Paul and Minneapolis will feature artwork unique to its location. Each station’s art came with a $187,000 budget and involved residents in the planning.”

The GleanWhere there’s any kind of government activity there is muscle. The Strib’s Pat Doyle reports: “Lee Lynch wasn’t at the closed-door meeting where Gov. Mark Dayton, legislative leaders and Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak decided to delay the Southwest Corridor light-rail project. But he might as well have been. The former advertising mogul is a driving force behind efforts by a group of prominent Minneapolis Kenilworth residents to block plans to run the Twin Cities’ biggest and most expensive light-rail line near their homes. ‘Good news for us on the Gov’s decision,’ Lynch e-mailed two hours after Dayton announced the delay. A half-dozen Kenilworth foes gave about $350,000 over the years to federal and state Democratic campaigns and liberal causes, including thousands of dollars to campaigns for Dayton and Rybak. They are now part of a larger group raising more money to bankroll a potential court fight if plans for the light-rail line move forward.” You’re not surprised, are you?

The AP’s Dinesh Ramde reports on the federal trial over Wisconsin’s Voter ID law: “[T]he closely watched federal trial is set to begin Monday over a Wisconsin law requiring voters to show photo ID at the polls. The outcome could set a precedent for legal challenges in dozens of states that have imposed or stiffened voter ID requirements in recent years. The Wisconsin law passed in 2011 and was in effect for the February 2012 primary, but it was later blocked when a judge handling a separate state lawsuit declared the measure unconstitutional. Advocates have pursued a federal trial while that decision and others are appealed. Supporters maintain the Republican-backed law is needed to combat voter fraud, but opponents contend it’s nothing more than a thinly veiled attempt to disenfranchise poor and minority voters.”

Remember the fringe candidate in New York a couple of years ago who ran on the “Rent’s Too Damned High” ticket? Bob Shaw of the PiPress says: “[L]ower-income renters are getting hit by the biggest rent increases in 12 years, according to the Minnesota Housing Partnership. Average metro-area rents are approaching $1,000 a month. Although rents have increased by 6 percent since 2000, the incomes of renters have dropped by an inflation-adjusted 17 percent, the partnership reported. About half of all Minnesota renters pay more than 30 percent of their income in rent, said Chip Halbach, partnership director. ‘It’s a rapidly worsening situation,’ he said. The rent increases are surprising because officials have been saying for years that the recession is over, average incomes are recovering and the affordability of home ownership is improving.”

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Comments (4)

  1. Submitted by Steve Titterud on 11/04/2013 - 08:28 am.

    Star-Trib: rent “increases are…surprising” ??

    “The rent increases are surprising because officials have been saying for years that the recession is over, average incomes are recovering and the affordability of home ownership is improving.”, according to the article.

    It’s not surprising at all to anyone who has direct observation and experience of the cost of housing in the local market.

    However, if you’re in the Star-Tribune’s fabricated, fantasy world of propaganda and phony “journalism”, what a surprise it would be that rents are higher than officialdom would have you believe !!

    • Submitted by Rachel Weisman on 11/04/2013 - 11:22 am.

      Star-Tribune?

      …Bob Shaw of the PiPress

    • Submitted by Steve Titterud on 11/04/2013 - 12:26 pm.

      Named the wrong culprit; commented too early in a.m.,…

      …brain still warming up.

      The entire comment and header could and should have left any reference to any newspaper, to make the best sense, as in:

      “The rent increases are surprising because officials have been saying for years that the recession is over, average incomes are recovering and the affordability of home ownership is improving.”, according to the article.

      It’s not surprising at all to anyone who has direct observation and experience of the cost of housing in the local market.

  2. Submitted by Brad Robinson on 11/04/2013 - 10:37 am.

    Use of Rent Data

    “Although rents have increased by 6 percent since 2000, the incomes of renters have dropped by an inflation-adjusted 17 percent, the partnership reported.”

    To compare the two shouldn’t you use inflation-adjusted rent increases as well? It sort of looks like the data was massaged to draw a predetermined conclusion.

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