As bird-flu costs mount, Legislature looks to send more money to agencies

REUTERS/Brian Snyder

The costs of the avian flu outbreak are mounting, and the Legislature has taken notice. In the Grand Forks Herald, the Forum News Services’ Don Davis reports, “The Minnesota House agriculture finance committee Tuesday night voted to add nearly $1.8 million to the fight and its chairman said more is on the way. Chairman Rod Hamilton, R-Mountain Lake, said no one knows how much money is needed, adding that House Speaker Kurt Daudt and Majority Leader Joyce Peppin understand the importance of providing funds to combat the disease that has resulted in about 1.5 million turkey deaths in the state in the past month and a half.”  

Which makes for bad timing for Wednesday’s wild turkey hunting season opener. Although MPR’s Lorna Benson notes “the virus has not been found in wild turkeys …” and “…the risk of contracting the disease is thought to be very low,” state officials are still providing hunters with a list of tips for safety for hunters.

Today in getting your hopes up: Jake Laxen’s story in the St. Cloud Times is topped with the headline “Sunday liquor sales vote could be close.” What’s changed this time? “Previous repeal attempts on the 80-year-old law were denied by a 42-22 state Senate vote in 2014 and a 106-21 state House vote in 2013. … ‘We’ve been hearing both sides of the story,’ said Republican St. Cloud representative Tama Theis. ‘We will continue to have those debates. It’s not truly a black or white issue.’ ”

A major fire Wednesday morning on West Broadway in north Minneapolis. The Star Tribune’s Libor Jany and Paul Walsh report: “Fire erupted in a building Wednesday morning that houses numerous side-by-side businesses on West Broadway in north Minneapolis, authorities said. The blaze first struck at 913 W. Broadway, where an Unbank check-cashing and loan business operates, the Fire Department said. … ‘This whole block is gone,’ [neighbor Penny Hopkins] said. ‘It’s a demolition job now.’ ”

A beautifully illustrated, photographed and written essay from the Heavy Table takes you on an eating tour of Central Ave. in Northeast Minneapolis, from Paradise Biryani Pointe to Flameburger. Your Glean editors had to curate this item on an empty stomach. Do not make that mistake.

In other news…

A computer crash caused an interruption in statewide student testing. Our No. 2 pencils never crashed, just saying. [KARE]

Twin Cities workers’ fight for a $15/hr. minimum wage continues [MPR]

High fire danger today in Minnesota and Wisconsin [Rochester Post Bulletin]

In a naked bid for your clicks, City Pages’ Mike Brody lists off “5 Things St. Paul Does Better Than Minneapolis.”

Today in public subsidies:

Bob Collins bemoans the death of Minneapolis parks’ 10 m.p.h. bike-path speed limit. (Though, we should note, they’re not setting a speed minimum.) [MPR’s NewsCut]

The most Canadian crime ever discovered in Cook County: “Canadians smuggled marijuana in maple syrup cans, authorities say.” Is it just me or are these pancakes like, really good? [Pioneer Press]

Violence on the border: “Argument Between Fishermen Escalates Into Fatal Stabbing in Wis.” [KSTP]

Is it time for the healing to begin at the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District board? Hennepin County replaced a manager on Tuesday [Star Tribune]

There’s something in the water in Dakota County. No, really: “Unsafe nitrate levels found in Dakota County wells” [Pioneer Press]

Did you know Mad Men’s Rich Sommer (he plays Harry Crane) is from Stillwater? He’s hosting a couple of fundraisers for the library there. [Stillwater Current]

Some consolation to Badger fans: Minnesota native Tyus Jones is leaving Duke to enter the NBA [KSTP]

The Wedge Co-op is selling Gardens of Eagan [Pioneer Press]

Here’s a video of a Como Zoo sloth eating a corn cob. Cute, yes, but look at those nightmare claws. [Como Zoo on Facebook]

Comments (2)

  1. Submitted by Ray Schoch on 04/15/2015 - 01:52 pm.

    Let’s find out

    “Unsafe nitrate levels found in Dakota County wells” [Pioneer Press]

    First, find out if it’s from sewage. If that source can be eliminated, I look forward to the defenses offered by local farmers, who will surely insist that this CAN’T be from their farms and/or agricultural practices. It’s worth finding out if those defenses have any validity. If they do, great. We should keep looking for the source(s). If they don’t, it’s time for the legislature to put some agricultural feet to the fire.

    • Submitted by Joe Smithers on 04/16/2015 - 11:35 am.

      right

      I’m interested to find out the culprit as well. Typically the wells would only be contaminated if a concentrated manure source without a liner is very near a well or a spill occurs. I suppose it is possible they have some sensitive aquifers in the county that could be contaminated by normal land application but I don’t know the geography of Dakota County that well to know for sure.

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