Dayton considers June special session

MinnPost photo by Briana Bierschbach
Lt. Gov. Tina Smith and Gov. Mark Dayton

Mulligan! MPR’s Tim Pugmire reports that Dayton is contemplating handing legislators a do-over: “Gov. Mark Dayton says he plans to tell legislative leaders next week what his requirements would be for a potential special session. … Many lawmakers want another chance to act on the bonding bill that failed to make it to the governor’s desk in the closing minutes of the 2016 session. … Dayton told reporters Wednesday that he will start thinking about a special session this weekend, after he’s acted on the remaining bills on his desk, including the tax bill and supplemental budget bill.”

What went wrong in Buhl. Continuing its series of reports on the soon-to-close Mesabi Academy juvenile correctional facility, APM Reports gives a picture of the failures at multiple levels that enabled the abuse and cover-up there: “A flawed, confused system prevents judges, social services officials and guardians from discovering critical information about the condition of the residential treatment facilities regulated by the Department of Corrections. Mesabi Academy, scheduled to close next month, is a case study. Since opening in 1998, the juvenile correctional facility had been seen as a reliable jobs provider, receiving subsidies from government and tens of millions of dollars in loans from its parent. But attempts to sustain the business may have compromised resident and worker safety.”

Is the Twin Cities hip-hop scene too white? At the Twin Cities Daily Planet, Kayla Steinberg raises the question: “Minnesota is more than a thousand miles away from hip hop’s mainstays on either coast. Yet, Complex listed Minneapolis as one of the 15 best cities for hip hop fans in the United States, and Mic named the Twin Cities the ‘greatest hip-hop scene you’ve never heard of.’ … Despite the geographical pull to mimic other regions, Twin Cities hip hop has managed to trademark its own experimental sound, humble aesthetic (most artists opt for toned down and muted attire), and, of course, the white supremacy that comes with our state’s infamous Minnesota Nice.”

Are food trucks too loud? Over at streets.mn, Old Man Lindeke has some concerns: “I like food trucks. I’m usually too cheap to spend $10 on food truck food, but that doesn’t matter because they do a great job at enlivening our public spaces. Food trucks mean more people outside, occupying formerly empty spots in the streetscape. … That said, one overlooked aspect of food trucks is their noise. For all the public space good that food trucks do, it only takes one bad generator to ruin a sidewalk.”

Makes sense. Via WCCO: “a year after it happened, details of an intrusion at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport are being released. … According to an Associated Press investigation, which uncovered the security breach, a man with a knife jumped the fence in February of last year. A report of the intrusion said the man told authorities he went for a walk from a nearby hotel to avoid a fight with his girlfriend.

In other news…

The side lesson from this is: Don’t use the work computer for, uh, personal business. “Move Minneapolis leader fires back at scathing city audit” [Star Tribune]

Will the DNR stop passing the buck? Probably not unless they get more doe. [So, so sorry]: “DNR needs better plan, better numbers on deer” [Star Tribune]

Largest high school mountain bike team in the state, apparently: “Stillwater mountain biking team has a new home” [Pioneer Press]

Maybe, as a general rule, just stay away from Facebook? “Officer suspended for 10 days for social media posts” [Rochester Post Bulletin]

Go Maxwell! “Minnesota 8th-grader advances to finals at national spelling bee” [MPR]

R.I.P. Harriet the Eagle: “Eagle That Appeared On Minnesota License Plate Dies At 35” [WCCO]

Everything NOT terrible: “Vikings QB lured to birthday party with rap video” [MPR]

Buddy flick in the making:

Comments (1)

  1. Submitted by Julie Barton on 05/26/2016 - 02:42 pm.

    “Maybe, as a general rule, just stay away from Facebook?”

    From the source article:

    “While acknowledging the images are “unacceptable” and “clearly offensive to our community, they were not reflective of the values Ben has demonstrated in his personal and professional life,” Peterson said in a statement.:

    And yet, these postings on social media ARE a demonstration of values he holds in his personal life. If they were not, he wouldn’t have posted/shared this type of thing.

    You have a First Amendment right to say things, sure, but that does not mean you shouldn’t be held responsible for what you say. Or at least held to account.

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