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Former St. Paul Mayor Coleman drops out of governor's race

Former St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman
MinnPost file photo by Terry Gydesen
Former St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman

The herd is thinning. Tad Vezner and Frederick Melo of the PiPress report, “Former St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman has suspended his campaign for Minnesota governor. ... Democrat Tim Walz and Republican Jeff Johnson were the big winners in straw polls for governor at the Feb. 6 precinct caucuses.n In the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party balloting, Walz, the 1st District congressman from Mankato, led a crowded field with more than 30 percent of the votes.”

At MPR, Brian Bakst says, “Coleman hadn't ruled out running in a primary if he couldn't secure the party's June endorsement for the open governor's mansion. But doing so would have required him to considerably ramp up fundraising and left him to consider stepping up his criticism of Walz. Coleman, 56, completed his third term as mayor in January, allowing him to tout his executive experience in the race.”

At the Huff Post, Rowaida Abdelaziz reports: “A conservative activist in Minnesota introduced a resolution last week to ‘minimize and eliminate the influence of Islam’ in the state’s Republican Party. Jeff Baumann, a notorious anti-Muslim activist in Minnesota’s Senate District 36, also urged in the resolution that ‘no Islamic leader, religious or otherwise, shall ever be allowed to deliver the invocation at any Republican convention or event.’ … Reached by phone Monday, Baumann argued that ‘there is a natural tension’ between Islam and the U.S. Constitution, calling the religion a ‘collective’ where there is ‘very little room for Muslims to have independent thought.’ He also said Muslim-Americans currently involved in politics are ‘dishonest.’”

About that Minneapolis police officer on trial. Brandt Williams of MPR reports, “An ex-cop testified that he didn't think Minneapolis police officer Efrem Hamilton was justified in using deadly force after a car backed into Hamilton's squad in Nov. 2016. The former officer, Mike Quinn, also talked about why officers may protect each other in court after a prosecutor questioned whether witnesses may have changed their testimony. Quinn was a Minneapolis police officer for nearly 24 years. Over the last several years, Quinn has been paid to testify in use of force cases — often against officers.”

More money. also from Bakst: “Minnesota state government far exceeded its revenue projections for January, another sign that lawmakers could wind up with a projected surplus to spread around rather than have to deal with a deficit this spring. Tax collections last month were almost $350 million, or 16 percent, stronger than expectations. That bodes well for an all-important economic outlook that will be released later this month. The upcoming comprehensive tax-and-spending report will set the bar for the legislative session.”

Holding out for ‘Mnuchin: the Musical’: MPR reports, “Finally, you won't have to travel to Chicago or New York to see the hip hop musical ‘Hamilton’ about Alexander Hamilton that has taken Broadway by storm. The fiery musical written by Tony-winner Lin-Manuel Miranda will launch the Hennepin Theatre Trust's 2018-19 season with a six-week run beginning on Aug. 29 at the Orpheum Theatre.”

Wells Fargo watch: Jeff Johanns at Marketwatch says, “Wells Fargo investors have learned a lot about the bank’s worsening issues recently, but they should be watching carefully over the next couple of weeks for possibly more bad news — from the bank’s auditors, KPMG. KPMG must opine on Wells Fargo’s internal controls by around March 1, and investors might not like the answer: the very real possibility of an adverse opinion from the auditors identifying material weaknesses in the bank’s controls. … there is enough publicly available evidence to conclude that a determination that there do exist material weaknesses in Wells Fargo’s internal controls is a valid potential outcome, requiring the issuance of an adverse opinion by the external auditor. The most recent consent cease-and-desist order likely makes the evidence overwhelming.”  

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Comments (1)

Stagecoach Robbery

Wells is a criminal operation (very thinly) disguised as a bank. Why anyone would do business with them is a mystery great than I can solve.