Minnesota Supreme Court ruling may invalidate thousands of DWI convictions

Minnesota Supreme Court

Potentially big DWI ruling. KSTP’s Todd Wilson reports: “Thousands of convictions in Minnesota could potentially be thrown out after a ruling Wednesday from the Minnesota Supreme Court. … Individuals convicted of refusing to consent to tests for chemical impairment could have it wiped off their records. … In the last 10 years, nearly 13,000 people in Minnesota have been pulled over for suspicion of driving while intoxicated, refused to take a chemical test and been convicted of it.”

Also in legal news. The Star Tribune’s Rochelle Olson reports: “Abortion opponents Wednesday lost an appeal that challenged the University of Minnesota’s use of aborted fetal tissue for medical research. … The state Court of Appeals said the lawsuit filed in 2016 by Pro-Life Action Ministries is moot because the Legislature clarified the law, specifically allowing research on aborted fetal tissue, while the case was pending. … The suit had argued that the U was in violation of a 32-year-old law regarding disposal of fetal remains from abortions. Under that law, the use was restricted to tests necessary for the health of a woman, her future children or a criminal investigation.”

War on weed. KSTP’s Ellen Galles reports: “Normandale Lake is disappearing for the winter. … Officials with the Nine Mile Creek Watershed District and the City of Bloomington are getting aggressive about getting rid of the curly leaf pondweed there. … It’s an invasive weed that grows rapidly, overtakes the native plant population and causes algae growth. … The plan is to drain the lake into Nine Mile Creek in hopes the harsh Minnesota winter will freeze the sediment bed and kill the invasive weed. … The lake will then be filled back up again in the spring.”

Might be easier to just ban cars at this point. MPR’s Tim Pugmire reports: “Frustrated lawmakers directed the Minnesota Department of Public Safety earlier this year to get information from private vendors on the feasibility of developing a system to replace the Minnesota Licensing and Registration System, which had its faulty launch last summer. … The directive was part of a bill passed last session to provide $9.6 million in emergency funding for MNLARS repairs. … Three firms — Business Information Systems (BIS), Celtic Systems and FAST Enterprises — submitted preliminary proposals for replacing MNLARS. … A Department of Public Safety report to the Legislature on the three responses shows that turning MNLARS over to private contractors would significantly boost a price tag that is already topping $100 million after a decade of work.

In other news…

Closing the loop on this:Long sentence for Twin Cities man who ‘left trail of tears’ cheating women he met online” [Star Tribune]

Great day for the Get Together …This is the least-crowded day to go to the State Fair” [MPR]

… or not:Headed to the fair? So is everyone else: All State Fair park and ride lots are full” [Star Tribune]

Congrats:20-year-old student from Todd County crowned Princess Kay” [KARE]

Pretty interesting:9 things I thought fishing trash out of Cedar Lake in Minneapolis” [City Pages]

Comments (2)

  1. Submitted by tim johnson on 08/23/2018 - 04:56 pm.

    “Thousands of convictions in Minnesota could potentially be thrown out after a ruling Wednesday from the Minnesota Supreme Court.”

    Interesting piece on DWI consent cases….seems like a ruling in the right direction.
    But police can find almost anything to use as a plausible reason for a stop; then find alcohol impairment apparently apparent. ..soo.. tough call; we need to reduce drunk driving, but we don’t ant to go too far into a police state. Minnesota is right to reject checkpoint sobriety stops…

    and, potentially the department of redundancy department: “could be…” MEANS potentially, possibly…..nearly always “potentially” is a wasted word; cut it out.
    Wanna second opinion? It’s ugly, too.

  2. Submitted by william bearman on 08/23/2018 - 08:27 pm.

    Dept. of Public Safety

    Here’s a novel approach to our DMV problem. Check with the other states and find the one with the best DMV program. Buy program. Delete the name of the state where ever it appears and in it’s place, plug in MINNESOTA. Test program. Implement.

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