Minnesota forests changing dramatically because of climate change

Lebanon Hills Regional Park
MinnPost photo by Corey Anderson
Lebanon Hills Regional Park

Says Elizabeth Dunbar for MPR, “The United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has released a new report that details just how much scientists say we need to limit greenhouse gas emissions to avoid catastrophe. It’s a high-level report that looks at the global effects of climate change, but what does it mean for Minnesota? … The most significant change Minnesota has seen is warmer winters, which can affect everything from ice on lakes to the snow season for winter recreation … Northern Minnesota’s forests, for instance, have changed dramatically.”

In the Duluth News Tribune, John Myers says, “On the same day an international panel of climate experts predicted dire consequences if human-caused global warming continues unabated, scientists at the University of Minnesota added northern forests to the list of potential victims. Scientists looked at 11 species of trees growing in two northern Minnesota forests and said predicted temperatures will cause drier soils and reduce tree growth even as temperatures warm. Scientists had hoped that trees might grow faster in warmer conditions. But when they added temperatures predicted to occur in northern Minnesota in future decades, they found the opposite occurred.”

Says Matt McKinney of the Star Tribune, “The past week of gloomy, wet skies with more forecast in the days ahead means that this so-far underwhelming fall will likely produce dimmer fall colors, fewer pumpkin patch visits and a lot more time to read by the fire. That’s the prediction so far as rainy weather settles over large stretches of the state this week, prompting the National Weather Service to issue a flood watch for the Twin Cities and most of southern and southeastern Minnesota.”

Also in the Strib, Stephen Montemayor reports, “Four men arrested after a historic meth bust in Minneapolis last month now face federal drug and gun charges, according to a new criminal complaint that raised the total of meth seized to 191 pounds. The case is described as the largest meth seizure in state history; newly filed court papers show that it turned on the help of a DEA informant and surveillance footage seized from an Inver Grove Heights storage business allegedly used to warehouse drugs.”

For MPR, Mark Zdechlik says, “Outside a hardware store along a busy road through downtown Grand Rapids, Everette Kingsley, 74, from nearby Hill City, says he’s voting for Republican Pete Stauber this fall because Trump supports him. ‘I think Trump’s doing a good job,’ Kinglsey said. Trump narrowly lost Minnesota two years ago but he won big in the 8th District — by nearly 16 percentage points. … Republicans hope strong support for Trump in northern Minnesota will help them flip the open seat.”

Mila Kuompilova of the Strib writes, “The University of Minnesota’s wish list for its next president includes a knack for innovation and business acumen. Several regents and state lawmakers argue it should also feature a willingness to work for relatively modest pay. They say the right candidates would be so keen on a prestigious, rewarding public service post that they would accept a salary markedly lower than the $625,250 the president now makes.”

MPR’s Martin Moylan reports: “Target will finally have stores in all 50 states when it opens its first store in Vermont later this month. The store opens Oct. 21 in South Burlington. And it’s much smaller than the typical Target. ‘The store will be 60,000 square feet. And that is in contrast to a full-size Target store (that) is about 130,000 square feet,’ said Jacqueline DeBuse, a spokesperson for the retailer. DeBuse says in stores that small the company chooses a selection of products to fit the community.”

From KSTP-TV’s Callan Gray: “This month, thousands of volunteers will visit homeless shelters around the state to determine how many people in Minnesota are living without stable housing. Wilder Foundation researchers do the count every three years. In 2015, researchers found about 15,000 people are homeless on any given night. When the 1,300 volunteers and professionals do the survey at the end of the month, they will interview people staying at emergency shelters, domestic violence shelters and transitional housing. They will also work to reach those at homeless encampments around the state.”

Comments (2)

  1. Submitted by Ray Schoch on 10/09/2018 - 07:25 am.

    “…They say the right candidates would be so keen on a prestigious, rewarding public service post that they would accept a salary markedly lower than the $625,250 the president now makes…”

    Just out of curiosity, what are head coaches (men and women) of varsity sports being paid at the U?

    I also wonder at what point do the responsibilities and duties of the U’s president exceed those of the President of the United States? Only then should the university’s chief executive earn more than the country’s chief executive. That, of course, makes some of the coaching salaries even more ludicrous.

    • Submitted by B. Dalager on 10/09/2018 - 01:51 pm.

      “I also wonder at what point do the responsibilities and duties of the U’s president exceed those of the President of the United States? Only then should the university’s chief executive earn more than the country’s chief executive.”

      What a weird standard. The President of the United States doesn’t have a salary controlled by the market.

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