Walker denied third term as Wisconsin governor

Wisconsin Lt. Governor Rebecca Kleefisch announcing on Wednesday morning that Gov. Scott Walker's campaign is going to seek a recount.
REUTERS/Nick Oxford
Wisconsin Lt. Governor Rebecca Kleefisch announcing on Wednesday morning that Gov. Scott Walker's campaign is going to seek a recount.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports: “After upending Wisconsin politics and infuriating liberals across the country, Gov. Scott Walker narrowly lost his bid for a third term Tuesday to Tony Evers, the leader of the education establishment Walker blew up eight years ago.  The Associated Press called the race for Evers about 1:20 a.m. Wednesday based on unofficial returns. The race was so close that Walker’s team said a detailed review of balloting and a recount were possible. But an unofficial tally had Evers winning by 1.1 percentage points — a margin that would be too large for a recount if it held.”

From the Associated Press, The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse quietly paid a pornographic movie star to deliver a lecture to students. “The La Crosse Tribune reported that the university paid Nina Hartley $5,000 out of student fees to speak to students about adult entertainment and taking ownership of their sexuality on Nov. 1. About 70 students attended the 90-minute talk. She told students it’s acceptable to enjoy pornography, acceptable to not enjoy it and acceptable to be confused about it.”

A Strib commentary by Larry Jacobs and Kathryn Pearson says, “Here is what we discovered about spending on Minnesota elections. No. 1: Republican supporters, including corporations and conservative groups bankrolled by the infamous Koch Brothers, did not dominate campaign spending in Minnesota this year. … Democratic contributors — including individuals, parties and independent expenditure groups — outspent Republican contributors by more than half. In raw dollars, Democrats enjoyed a $70 million to $46 million advantage. Time to question the myth that Republicans and conservatives dominate the money game.”

Tony Kennedy of the Strib says, “Despite mostly fair weather and a good number of licenses sold to hunters, the opening weekend of Minnesota’s traditional firearms deer season ended with a shortfall of whitetails. …  The biggest slump occurred in northeastern Minnesota, where hunters filled 21.5 percent fewer deer tags than they did last year.”


Brandt Williams at MPR reports, “A court-ordered mental health evaluation has found Jerry Lee Curry, 52, competent to stand trial for charges that he abused his developmentally disabled daughters. However, Curry’s defense attorney want a second opinion. … The criminal charges against Curry also allege that he raped and impregnated his daughter known as ‘victim B’ who gave birth to the child last October. That baby girl has been placed in a foster home with her four-year-old brother. According to court records, the four-year-old boy’s father is not known. And the boy’s foster parents have expressed an interest in adopting the siblings.”

The AP says, “Wisconsin prosecutors have filed vehicular homicide charges against a 21-year-old man who police say was inhaling chemical vapors before he crashed his truck into a group of Girl Scouts, killing three children and one adult. The 11 charges filed against Colten Treu on Tuesday include four counts of vehicular homicide and four counts of a hit-and-run resulting in death. The punishment for those charges alone is up to 160 years in prison.”

KSTP has a report on how a chipped pets could prevent drug addicts from targeting veterinarian clinics: “Earlier this year, two veterinarians north of the Twin Cities designed a system where doctors can scan a microchip implanted into a pet to determine whether another doctor recently prescribed powerful painkillers for the animal. ‘We need to do something. There’s a problem,’ said Dr. Jennifer Schurrer, who worked on the program with colleague, Dr. Mary Olson at East Central Veterinarians in Cambridge, Minnesota.”

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