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Lake Superior cisco stocks threatened

Lake Superior
MinnPost file photo by Steve Date
Lake Superior

Less ice means less fish. MPR’s Daniel Ackerman reports: “The cisco is a fish in demand: Its meat graces Passover tables as gefilte fish, and its eggs are a delicacy in Scandinavia. Commercial fishing operations on Lake Superior’s North Shore depend on it, netting hundreds of thousands of pounds of the silvery, foot-long fish from the lake each year. … But there are signs that the cisco, also known as lake herring, may also be a fish in peril.

What’s going on here? The Minnesota Daily’s Dylan Anderson writes: “Last month, several swastikas and the phrase ‘white power’ were graffitied in a bathroom stall at the University of Minnesota Law School. … Law School Dean Garry Jenkins was quick to condemn the vandalism in a statement: … ‘We were – and continue to be – angered by the hateful, anti-Semitic language and imagery that was found in our building last month. It was despicable and has no place on our campus or in our community.’ … The several anti-Semitic incidents on campus in recent years can do more than make students feel unwelcome, making them feel unsafe. About 20 percent of Jewish students on campus reported they felt their group was respected in 2018, compared to about 42 percent in national surveys, according to figures presented to the Board of Regents last month.”

Campus building-name removed. The Pioneer Press’ Josh Verges reports: “Macalester College is removing its founder’s name from two campus buildings in response to recent campus outcry over his ‘racist and dehumanizing’ writings toward indigenous people, the school announced Monday. … The Rev. Edward Duffield Neill was a Presbyterian pastor and historian who became Minnesota’s first superintendent of public instruction and the University of Minnesota’s first chancellor before founding Macalester in 1874. … American Indian students in recent years have called attention to Neill’s more troubling views of indigenous people, as well as female students. The campus newspaper Mac Weekly last month published a special issue on Neill and other namesakes of campus buildings. … President Brian Rosenberg last week recommended Neill’s name be removed from both Neill Hall and a room inside Weyerhaeuser Hall. The Board of Trustees then approved the moves.

Bag fee. KMSP’s Hannah Flood reports: “A debate on the future of single-use plastic bags in the city of Minneapolis is set to continue Monday. … The City Council will hold a 1:30 p.m. public hearing to hear if residents think the city should require businesses to charge customers five cents for every single-use plastic bag. … The bags in question are the ones you get at the checkout counter at grocery stores. The city’s proposal would put a five cent charge on each bag to encourage people to bring their own reusable bags to the store when they shop.


Legal beef. The Star Tribune’s Jackie Crosby reports: “This battle won’t get bloody, but it might get ugly. … The question is whether the phrase ‘The Vegan Butcher’ can be trademarked. And if so, who can lay claim to it? … The Herbivorous Butcher, a sibling-owned Minneapolis business lauded as America’s first meat-free market, is taking on Nestlé, a multinational food corporation, in hopes of either winning the legal right to continue using the phrase or to keep it in the public domain so others in the growing marketplace for plant-based foods can use it, too.”

In other news…

Not good:Land affected by Keystone pipeline leak bigger than thought” [Star Tribune]

FYI:‘RSV’ Dangers: MN Health Officials Warn Parents Of Illness With Cold-Like Symptoms” [WCCO]

Infrastructure woes:‘Range anxiety’: As e-vehicle use grows, charging stations outside Twin Cities lag” [Star Tribune]

A Twins prospect:Major League Baseball prospect found dead in New Zealand” [Washington Post]

Bye:Vikings hero Jayron Kearse told Twitter he’s leaving Minnesota” [City Pages]

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