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Minnesota police want addresses of positive COVID-19 cases

Medical test papers, please. The Star Tribune’s Chao Xiong reports:Police across Minnesota are asking state authorities to share with them the location of people infected with COVID-19 to prevent the virus’ spread among first responders and the public. … The state’s three largest professional law enforcement associations — the Minnesota Chiefs of Police Association, the Minnesota Sheriffs’ Association and the Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association — appealed directly to Minnesota Department of Health Commissioner Jan Malcolm.”

Might as well just stay in. The Pioneer Press’ Chris Bianchi reports: “It’s not like forecasting the Twin Cities’ weather is particularly easy to begin with. But a loss of weather observations from commercial aircraft, due to a sharp decrease in flights related to coronavirus lockdowns, may make local weather forecasting even more difficult. … Last week, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), which operates the European model, said a big loss of aircraft observations was likely going to have direct implications on computer forecast models’ skill levels.”

Meat demand. The West Central Tribune’s Michelle Rook reports: “The coronavirus pandemic has shocked the nation and the markets and that has an impact in the country on the agricultural and food production industry. Many of the agricultural futures prices have dropped like the stock market on fear of recession and slower near-term demand. … While social media posts depict empty grocery store shelves and meat cases, once that supply is restocked, the reality is more Americans will be making meals at home and are not eating out at restaurants and this curbs demand. The cattle market has been especially sensitive to that fact.

Recreation without creation of risk for others. MPR’s Dan Kraker reports: “Outdoor activities like hiking, biking — and fishing — are explicitly allowed under Minnesota’s two-week stay-at-home order, which went into effect on March 27 as part of the state’s efforts to combat the spread of the new coronavirus. Driving for pleasure is allowed, too. But the order also restricts nonessential travel. … And in some rural areas, where people from elsewhere might travel to fish, hike, bike and recreate, local residents have cast a wary eye on visitors who might unintentionally carry the virus with them. Deciding exactly how far to travel during the state’s social distancing efforts is left to individuals — and the calculus is complicated.

They help the Target reach you. Motherboard’s Lauren Kaori Gurley reports: “Gig workers on Target’s delivery platform, Shipt, are organizing a walkout on Tuesday to protest the lack of safeguards in place to protect them during the coronavirus pandemic—the first worker-organized action against the gig economy giant. … Workers are demanding $5 of hazard pay per order, 14 days of paid sick leave for all workers regardless of whether they’ve received a positive coronavirus test, personal protective gear for all gig workers, and a return to a clear, commission-based pay model. Organizers are also asking customers to boycott the app on Friday, April 10 in solidarity with Shipt workers.”

In other news…

Did Minneapolis’ economy recover faster from the 1918 flu epidemic than St. Paul’s because the Mill City socially distanced longer?Cities That Went All In on Social Distancing in 1918 Emerged Stronger for It” [New York Times]

Essential service:Coronavirus In Minnesota: Brewers Asking Gov. Walz For Option To Sell Alcohol Curbside, Via Delivery” [WCCO]

Some of these sound pretty good:Coronavirus kitchen: 19 of the most upsetting ‘meals’ we’ve eaten since lockdown” [City Pages]

Well don’t go talon everyone:Duluth becomes bald eagle hub during spring migration” [Star Tribune]

“Appears structurally OK”:Wanna buy the tiniest house for sale in the Twin Cities?” [City Pages]

Comments (1)

  1. Submitted by Connie Sullivan on 04/08/2020 - 02:58 pm.

    Will those cops not come into a home where someone has had the coronavirus? Will they wait at an accident scene for wired information about the health status, as of last week or yesterday, of the guy bleeding to death on the street? Will they not pursue a speeding-away perp, if they don’t have hazmat suits and PPE on themselves?

    C’mon, cops.

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