Nonprofit, nonpartisan journalism. Supported by readers.

Donate
Topics

Minnesota State Patrol issues 705 body cameras

Plus: Five new deaths in Minnesota from COVID-19; stopping the spread of the invasive jumping worm; boys’ volleyball one vote short of becoming a sanctioned high school sport; and more.

Minnesota State Patrol officers standing between protesters and the capitol building at a George Floyd rally on May 31, 2020.
Minnesota State Patrol officers standing between protesters and the capitol building at a George Floyd rally on May 31, 2020.
REUTERS/Eric Miller

WCCO is reporting that the Minnesota State Patrol has finished its rollout of body-worn cameras. The agency has issued 705 body cameras and installed car camera systems in 244 vehicles. Troopers are projected to record over 3,200 pieces of video evidence – over 616 hours – per day now that the project is complete.

Via KSTP: On Tuesday, the Minnesota Department of Health reported five new deaths from COVID-19, 36 Minnesotans are in the ICU with COVID and 332 are in non-ICU hospital beds.

The city of Minneapolis plans to invest $3 million in federal funds in an effort to end childhood lead poisoning from rental housing. The aim is to put the city on a “path to eliminate childhood lead poisoning from housing” by the year 2035, city officials said, via WCCO.

Jeremiah Jacobsen at KARE-11 reports the Minnesota State High School League came up one vote short of approving boys volleyball as an officially sanctioned high school sport. According to MSHSL’s John Millea, MSHSL’s 48-member Representative Assembly voted 31-17 in favor of approving boys volleyball; however, the league’s bylaws require 32 votes for approval, or two-thirds of the vote.

Article continues after advertisement

From FOX9: The University of Minnesota is asking for the public’s help in stopping the spread of the “highly invasive” jumping worm. UMD professor Ryan Hueffmeier says, “Through their feeding and burrowing behaviors, they turn the topsoil into loose granular soil that can be easily eroded and does not support plant life well. Because of their ability to clone themselves, just one jumping worm can start a population, which makes them a difficult species to manage.”

The iconic Split Rock Lighthouse Visitor Center and Historic Site is closed Tuesday after a lightning strike during Monday’s storms. From WCCO, staff reported that lightning struck a tree in the parking lot. That tree then struck a light pole.

From Bring Me the News: The Raising Cane’s restaurant chain is looking to hire over 250 employees for new locations opening in Lakeville and Roseville next month. Starting pay for crew members is $15 per hour. Shift managers start at $18 per hour.

Tyler Kepner at the New York Times has a profile of Minnesota Twins center fielder Byron Buxton: “He’s the best player in the world, no doubt about it,” says shortstop Carlos Correa, “Playing in the same division with Mike Trout, playing with great players on the Astros — nobody has more talent than him. Nobody hits the ball farther. Nobody plays better defense. Nobody throws harder. Nobody runs faster.”