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Gov. Walz, law enforcement agencies discuss safety plans for the Minnesota State Fair

Plus: Neel Kashkari calls for tightening monetary policy; Scott Jensen doubles down on his COVID-19 restrictions/Hitler analogy; Indigenous communities impacted most by wildfire pollution; and more.

Gov. Tim Walz, center, and Department of Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington, right, et al., discussed safety at the Minnesota State Fair on Tuesday.
Gov. Tim Walz, center, and Department of Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington, right, et al., discussed safety at the Minnesota State Fair on August 23.
MinnPost photo by Peter Callaghan

Danny Spewak at KARE-11 attended Tuesday’s press conference where law enforcement officials unveiled their Minnesota State Fair safety plan. John Harrington, the commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, said the BCA has done a threat assessment and determined a “low” threat level. “We want the State Fair to go, and come, without there ever being a story,” Harrington said, “other than about the debate between Pronto Pups and corn dogs.”

In other fair news: Making the Get-Together great for everyone: State Fair focused on addressing accessibility [MPR News]

Matthew Boesler and Alister Bull at Bloomberg covered Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis President Neel Kashkari’s speech at the Wharton Club of Minnesota in Minneapolis on Tuesday: “By many, many measures we are at maximum employment and we are at very high inflation. So this is a completely unbalanced situation, which means to me it’s very clear: We need to tighten monetary policy to bring things into balance.”

Via FOX 9: Republican candidate for Minnesota governor Scott Jensen defended his comparison of COVID-19 restrictions to the rise of Hitler after he faced scrutiny from Jewish advocacy groups this week: “When I make a comparison that I saw government policies intruding on American freedoms, incrementally, one piece at a time and compare that to the 1930s. I think it’s a legitimate comparison. It might not strike your fancy, that’s fine. But this is how I think, and you don’t get to be my thought police person.”

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Diana Kruzman at Grist has a story on Indigenous communities, which tend to be located in rural areas closest to blazes, often have difficulties accessing air filters and upgrading homes to keep out the smallest particles, resulting in more vulnerability to the impacts of intensifying pollution from wildfires than other groups. The piece begins with the story of Li Boyd of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe.

Mike Hughlett at the Star Tribune reports with area code “507” running out of numbers, a new area code is planned for southern Minnesota in 2025.

Christine Schuster at Bring Me the News is reporting Milkweed Books, owned and operated by Milkweed Editions, has reopened on the first floor of Open Book after two years.

Black Headline News launched Wednesday morning. Viewers can watch the approximately five-hour online broadcast on partnering Black Press websites and will also be available on PEGMedia for TV distribution nationwide. The Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder is announced as one of the community partners.