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Health

Even good hospitals make mystifying mistakes

By Dr. Craig BowronFriday, March 21, 2008 Monday’s announcement by Methodist Hospital that a surgeon on staff mistakenly removed a patient’s healthy kidney proves once again that a hospital, even a really good hospital, can be a dangerous place.

Happy Pi Day!

It’s Pi Day — time to celebrate both the irrational and transcendental nature of the number. Pies, naturally, are the favored treats for mathematicians’ celebrations.

Transported by Mozart, under the Masonic eye

I almost spent Tuesday night channel-surfing between political pundits and a rerun of “NCIS.” But thanks to my friend John Dingley, I found myself seated in the Triune Masonic Temple in St.

Diet Coke and heart disease: The whole truth?

This year, Diet Coke is sponsoring The Heart Truth, a 10-city nationwide road show created in 2002 by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) to promote heart disease awareness among women.The show is making its first stop this weekend

Study causing some chest pains over cholesterol drug

The real purpose of cholesterol-lowering medications like Lipitor is to reduce atherosclerosis, the buildup of cholesterol within the lining of blood vessels.
Since it’s impractical to peek inside blood vessels to see how our treatment is going, we

The cold truth about cold medicines

Thanks to a report last fall by safety experts for the Food and Drug Administration, we now know that over-the-counter cough and cold medicines are not only ineffective, but also potentially dangerous for young children.

What’s less known is that

A rough three years for newspaper stocks

Alan Mutter, a media industry investment guru based in Silicon Valley, has published some stunning numbers at his blog Newsosaur on the decline in value of publicly traded newspaper companies.

Correct me if I’m wrong…

In an op-ed piece in the Star Tribune this week advocating school vouchers, Mitch Pearlstein, founder and executive director of Center of the American Experiment, wrote the following about Myron Orfield’s argument that racially segregated urban scho

DWI numbers that mean precisely nothing

Rarely do you see numbers butchered as badly as in the Minnesota Department of Public Safety’s announcement Wednesday that Hennepin County was the deadliest county in the state for alcohol-related deaths and injuries from 2004 to 2006.

Night work: Bad for your health

Shift work has been added to the list of risk factors for cancer, but there are other health problems you face when working nights and evenings.By Susan Perry

On the contributions side, Minnesota is decidedly purple

Political contributions for federal candidates, parties and political action committees are running heavily Democratic around the nation this year, but not here: In both the Twin Cities and the state of Minnesota, the parties are virtually tied.

Rape: The most common violent crime on campus

Minnesota college campuses exceed the national average in one area that no one wants them to: sexual assault.

University of Minnesota researchers are releasing today the 2007 College Student Health Survey Report, a sweeping survey of 10,000 studen

No more periods?

“Menstruation is not medically necessary.” That’s the quote that jumped out at me from a press release that recently crossed my desk.
Not medically necessary? I thought.

The party of the rich — Democrats or Republicans?

Is the Democratic Party the party of the rich? Many conservative commentators think so.
Or is the Republican Party the party of the rich? Many liberal commentators think so.
The conservatives tend to rely on evidence at the state level.

Where the jobs are, and aren’t

Welcome to Public Numbers, wherein a variety of MinnPost.com journalists will write Current Posts about numbers and public life — what we can learn from these numbers, and how to know when numbers are being misused.