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The benefits of writing for MinnPost

I have worked for other news outlets where chasing the daily story was expected. The MinnPost strategy is better — and a lot more fun.

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Peter Callaghan
One of the benefits of writing for MinnPost — and hopefully one of the benefits of reading the site — is we don’t feel obligated to chase the daily story. That saves us from the he said/she said recitation of quotes from contending press conferences which often lead to readers gasping for air … and facts. The approach frees up time to try to figure out what the story is behind the partisan narratives, to understand what the issues are and, yes, what the facts say.

I have worked for other news outlets where that type of daily chase was expected. The MinnPost strategy is better — and a lot more fun.

We knew 2020 was going to be a wild year in government and politics. We didn’t know how much we underestimated it until March, when the coronavirus shutdowns began and the Democratic nomination process quickly ended. Since then, working from home and the Capitol, I have tried to understand what questions readers might have and find answers to them. As we move into the final weeks of the campaign, our team of writers will look more deeply at federal and state races, at the influence being spread with donations and campaign ads and what actual voters think is going on.

But while our articles are free, reporting them costs money. MinnPost relies on the help of readers like you to bring essential information to the public. A donation of any amount helps make sure my colleagues and I can keep tracking the election, the pandemic and the far-reaching consequences of both. Will you donate right now?

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