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Covering the arts during a pandemic

The coming of COVID-19 has been devastating for the arts. Almost overnight, everything in our buzzing, vibrant arts economy changed.

Thursday, March 12, will forever be burned into my brain. That was the night I saw Ten Thousand Things’ production of “Thunder Knocking at My Door.” It was the last play I would see in person until … well, still.

Pamela Espeland
Photo by John Whiting
Pamela Espeland
The coming of COVID-19 has been devastating for the arts. Almost overnight, everything in our buzzing, vibrant arts economy changed. Theaters, clubs, concert halls and museums went dark. Countless events were canceled or postponed. Seasons were wiped out. Thousands of people lost gigs and jobs.

MinnPost’s Artscape column had to change, too, and quickly. It had always been more advocacy than criticism. How could it be of service in a time of great need? I asked dozens of artists and arts leaders how they were doing, what challenges they were facing and what they were learning. These interviews became a regular part of the column. They will continue in the weeks and months ahead.

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Artscape’s focus is big umbrella (cover everything!) and hyperlocal. If you find it useful and informative, if you care about the arts and think that Artscape helps you see them more clearly and value them more dearly, please make a donation to MinnPost. Any amount will be welcome.

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