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Erin's Law should be both funded and required in Minnesota

There are only three states in the country that have not passed or introduced legislation to require that personal body safety be taught to children in that state: Idaho, Wyoming, and Minnesota. I have tried for five years to have Erin's Law passed as a requirement in Minnesota. Last session Erin's Law SF 1346 was passed as "no money, no mandate." Zero dollars were given to prevent the sexual abuse of children in Minnesota through Erin's Law. It is estimated that Minnesota spends $560 million a year because it does not prevent the sexual abuse of its children. Minnesota spends $8 billion a year on sexual violence.

Why is Minnesota not willing to spend dollars preventing the sexual abuse of children when we know how? Personal body safety teaches children that if they are wearing a bathing suit, that part of their body is private. It explains that if someone is trying to touch them in a private area that they should tell a trusted adult.

We know that nine out of 10 children do not tell when they are sexually abused. We know that nine times out of 10 children are sexually abused by someone they know. We also know that often children are told not to tell.

As well, some children who are abused go on to become abusers. And so, the legacy of abuse passes down from generation to generation.

I hope everyone reading this will call their state senator and representative today and ask them to demand that personal body safety be required to be taught to kids in Minnesota. We need to stand up for child victims as they have no voice. Please make a call today and demand that Erin's Law be funded and be required in Minnesota. More information is at Erins LawMN on Youtube and Facebook.

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