Nonprofit, nonpartisan journalism. Supported by readers.

Donate

Whither the weather? Check our musical meteorology list

This has been one great run of beautiful weather, but we Minnesotans know it won’t last.

So, I wanted to get us ready for the inevitable change of seasons with a review of a few meteorological terms and conditions that dot weather reports throughout the year.

And since my scientific knowledge is far from advanced, I’m going for just the basics and — just for fun — a sampler of song titles that contain weather terms. (There must be hundreds, so I limited every category to only one to three, but feel free to add your favorites in the Comment section below.)

Temperatures
Hot: Sly and the Family Stone’s “Hot Fun in the Summertime”

Cold:  The Pixies Three with “Cold, Cold Winter” and Foreigner’s “Cold As Ice”

Warm: Connie Francis’ “I’m Gonna Be Warm This Winter”

Cool: The Fabulous Wailers’ “Tall Cool One”

Wide-ranging weather conditions
• Bob Dylan’s “Hurricane”

• Chi Coltrane’s “Thunder and Lightning”

• Lou Christie’s “Lightnin’ Strikes”

• The Classics IV’s “Stormy”

• The Murmaids’ “Popsicles and Icicles”

Rainy weather
• The Sir Douglas Quintet’s “The Rains Came”

• Jane Morgan’s “The Day That the Rains Came”

• Dinah Washington’s “September in the Rain”

Sky conditions
• Barry McGuire’s “Cloudy Summer Afternoon” and Simon Garfunkel’s “Cloudy,” including the great lyrics:

“Cloudy
My thoughts are scattered and they’re cloudy,
They have no borders, no boundaries.
They echo and they swell
From Tolstoy to Tinker Bell.
Down from Berkeley to Carmel …”

• Hoagy Carmichael’s “Ole Buttermilk Sky” 

High winds
• Frank Sinatra’s “Summer Wind” and Glenn Yarbrough’s “The Honey Wind Blows”

Sunshine songs
• The Rivieras’ “California Sun”

• Ray Charles’ astounding “You Are My Sunshine”

• Tommy Edwards’ mellow “Please Mr. Sun”

Winter weather
And I’ve saved the worst for last with our long-range forecast: winter. Here are two sad songs of that season — first, a clever, quintessential teen’s-lost-love lament, and then an absolute tear-jerker:

• Diane Ray’s “Snow Man”

• And then Gentleman Jim Reeves’ heartbreaking “The Blizzard.”

Comments (2)

  1. Submitted by Gin Kujawa on 10/08/2010 - 09:53 am.

    My favorite hot weather song is “Summer in the City” by the Lovin’ Spoonful.

  2. Submitted by Robert Moffitt on 10/08/2010 - 09:56 am.

    Surely The Weather Girls 1982 hit “Its Raining Men” deserves a spot on the list.

Leave a Reply