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MinnPost Picks: on moral injury, London’s most iconic floor plan and African American cooking

Our weekly roundup of great stories from around the web, as recommended by MinnPost’s staff and contributing journalists.

Photo by engin akyurt on Unsplash

On Top of Everything Else, the Pandemic Messed With Our Morals, The Atlantic

In 1994, Jonathan Shay, a clinical psychiatrist, coined the term “moral injury” after noticing that some American soldiers returned from Vietnam with profound changes to their character. Different than PTSD, moral injury is triggered by events violating the soldier’s moral code. Jonathan Moens writes about how the notion has gained traction during the pandemic among medical professionals, et al., having to uphold edicts like denying relatives a chance to say goodbye to dying loved ones.
—Corey Anderson, creative director

What’s Behind the Iconic Floor Plan of London, CityLab

I’m always interested in the practical underpinnings of design, and houses are no exception. This piece by CityLab explains why the “two-up, two-down” floor plan developed in the 18th century remains ubiquitous in London. The series, called “The Iconic Home Designs That Define Our Global Cities” also includes pieces on Japanese and Athenian apartment design, as well as World War II era homes in Toronto.
—Greta Kaul, data reporter

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High on the Hog: How African American Cuisine Transformed America, Netflix

Host Stephen Satterfield takes you on a culinary tour of sites significant to African American history, from Benin to the Georgia coast all the way to Texas. This series taught me a lot of history I hadn’t learned before, and the food all looks delicious.
—Tom Nehil, news editor

Indian Country’s Right to Say No, The New Republic

Nick Martin wrote about what tribal consultation with the U.S. government means in 2021, who is trying to change it, and what the possibilities might be.
—Jonathan Stegall, user-experience engineer