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MnSCU auditor: Credit-transfer system ‘needs fine tuning, but it’s not broken’

An internal auditor found that 91 percent of 16,309 transfer students in the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system did not lose credits toward their degree when they switched schools.

An internal auditor found that 91 percent of 16,309 transfer students in the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system did not lose credits toward their degree when they switched schools.

But 9.4 percent of the transfer students lost an average of six credits, which could have cost them about $1,080, according to a press release from MnSCU.

Credit transfer “needs fine tuning, but it’s not broken,” MnSCU internal auditor John Asmussen reportedly told the Board of Trustees today.

Data entry errors may have led to 2 percent of students in 2009 losing credits, but that problem has been fixed because electronic transcripts were implemented five months ago, Asmussen told trustees.

The study was requested after complaints by students and legislators about difficulties in transferring credits within the MnSCU system.

The report lists several recommendations (quoted verbatim):

  • Develop uniform and ongoing education for staff who train advisers
  • Clarify the use of syllabi, course outlines, or other course equivalency documents
  • Evaluate the complexity of the current transfer system and engage in ongoing improvement
  • Engage in a study session on transfer mechanisms nationally, and review models that could be used in Minnesota

The full report is available here and the press release is here.