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Police misconduct during RNC alleged in civil lawsuits

The Minnesota Independent notes that eight lawsuits have now been filed claiming police misconduct surrounding the Republican National Convention in St. Paul last September. And lawyers say there will be more.

The suits allege physical and sexual abuse, illegal searches and seizure of property, and wrongful detainment.

Although charges have been dropped against hundreds of the protesters and bystanders arrested during the convention, lawsuits like these have been expected.

Lots of anger from those searched and arrested. Said a woman from Oregon arrested on the second day: “I firmly believe that if they are going to declare war on our Constitutional rights of free speech, assembly and press that they should be tried as the war criminals that they are.”

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Comments (4)

  1. Submitted by Tom Weber on 03/02/2009 - 12:37 pm.

    I wonder what the person from Oregon thinks happened to my rigths when my wife and I were fearing for our safety when confronted with brick throwing protesters. Maybe the violent protesters should be tried as war criminals. I for one am thankful for the law enforcement that we had.

  2. Submitted by Herbert Davis on 03/02/2009 - 01:37 pm.

    Lawsuits have several benefits. Lawyers keep busy. The truth comes out most of the time.They establish a record of how we did or didn’t do at being “peace officers”. They help in planning for the next event.

    Sometimes it is better to have a court judgement than be condemned by accusation!

  3. Submitted by William Lynott on 03/02/2009 - 03:19 pm.

    “On March 2, 2009, Author Editor Tom Weber says:
    I wonder what the person from Oregon thinks happened to my rigths when my wife and I were fearing for our safety when confronted with brick throwing protesters. Maybe the violent protesters should be tried as war criminals. I for one am thankful for the law enforcement that we had.”

    It used to be that the police had to have probable cause before they could arrest someone. It also used to be that a person could not be arrested because the police “thought” s/he might be about to commit a crime. I don’t know when mass arrests of innocent people became legal, but this can’t be acceptable in a free society.

  4. Submitted by Tom Poe on 03/03/2009 - 08:52 am.

    I agree with Mr. Lynott, and add that when government actively pursues journalists with the intent to silence them, as happened here, there should be severe penalties delivered. I hope every lawsuit filed brings out the truth about the overreaching of the Bush policies of the last ten years.

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