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Little Falls mounting effort to save Lindbergh home from budget cuts

The city of Little Falls, the boyhood home of aviator Charles Lindbergh, isn’t idling on the runway while there are concerns at the Legislature that the Lindbergh historic site might close because of budget cuts.
The Brainerd Dispatch says the Litt

The city of Little Falls, the boyhood home of aviator Charles Lindbergh, isn’t idling on the runway while there are concerns at the Legislature that the Lindbergh historic site might close because of budget cuts.

The Brainerd Dispatch says the Little Falls Convention and Visitors Bureau is mobilizing residents to lobby legislators and the governor after the Minnesota Historical Society announced last week that it plans layoffs and the closing three historic sites, including the Lindbergh home.

Other sites that could be closed are Historic Forestville in Preston and North West Company Fur Post in Pine City.

(Also planned to save money: Reduced public access to Historic Fort Snelling from seven to five days a week except for prearranged group tours and school field trips; cuts in hours at Oliver H. Kelley Farm in Elk River, Mille Lacs Indian Museum and Trading Post in Onamia, Forest History Center in Grand Rapids, and Jeffers Petroglyphs in Comfrey; limited access to the Sibley House in Mendota; opening Alexander Ramsey House in St. Paul only during the November/December holiday season; and closing Mill City Museum in Minneapolis on Thursday evenings.)

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Little Falls Mayor Cathy VanRisseghem, who also is the city’s tourism director, said she has been getting emails and phone calls from several Minnesota cities, including Willmar and the Twin Cities, concerned with the closing of the Lindbergh home. She also heard from LeBourtet, France, Little Falls’ sister city.

The convention bureau has prepared letters that people can send to legislators and the governor, urging them to keep the site open.

So far, the bureau has sent out more than 1,000 letters. The goal is 5,000.

“We have people walking door to door to hand out letters and we have tons of volunteers,” said VanRisseghem. “This is how strongly people feel about the Lindbergh site. This site is a major draw to our area and we need to keep it open. If it would close, it ‘d be a loss to our history and heritage.”