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Pawlenty’s musings notwithstanding, Coleman won’t pursue options on felon-gate

Norm Coleman says he’s not going to pursue any further action following recent reports that more than 300 felons may have voted in the 2008 U.S. Senate race that he lost to Al Franken by 312 votes.
Minnesota Gov.

Norm Coleman says he’s not going to pursue any further action following recent reports that more than 300 felons may have voted in the 2008 U.S. Senate race that he lost to Al Franken by 312 votes.

Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty raised some eyebrows Wednesday when he jumped into the controversy Wednesday during a Fox News interview.

In an oddly worded response, he said he suspects that any illegally voting felons might have favored Franken, but hastened to add: “I don’t know that.” But if true, he said, “it may have flipped the election.”

But Coleman told the Star Tribune that he is “not looking back.”

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The paper said Coleman:

also termed Franken an “accidental senator,” who benefited from court rulings that overlooked an array of alleged voting irregularities.

“There’s always going to be a cloud of doubt that hovers over this election, and this thickens the cloud,” Coleman said.

The paper also said:

In fact, the only allegation of felonious voting in the election was raised by Franken’s legal team, which cited the case of a man in Warroad, Minn., with a felony conviction who voted for Coleman.