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Minnesota Family Council says its poll suggests Minnesotans want a governor against gay marriage

The Minnesota Family Council, along with the National Organization for Marriage, released a poll that,  they say, shows Minnesota voters want a governor who opposes gay marriage.

The Minnesota Family Council, along with the National Organization for Marriage, released a poll that,  they say, shows Minnesota voters want a governor who opposes gay marriage. And the groups believe the gay marriage issue could influence the November election for governor.

The poll was taken at the end of August and early September,and consists of telephone interviews with 695 likely voters.

The gist of the poll, according to MFC:

“When voters were asked which gubernatorial candidate they supported without knowing the candidates position on marriage, Dayton received 42% of the vote, Tom Emmer 33% and Tom Horner 12%. When people were then told that Dayton and Horner supported redefining marriage to include homosexual couples and refused to support allowing the people to vote on the issue, Emmer’s vote total rose 9 percentage points to 42%, Dayton’s dropped 6 percentage points to 36% of the vote, and Horner dropped 3 points to 9%.”

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Said Brian Brown, president of the National Organization for Marriage:

“The fact that the marriage issue can move Emmer from nine points down to six points ahead — a 15-percentage-point swing — is a very powerful demonstration of voters’ determination to defend traditional marriage. Voters in Minnesota speak with a clear voice — they support traditional marriage and they don’t want backroom political deals or unaccountable judges to redefine it.”

And Tom Prichard, president of the Minnesota Family Council, said:

“Clearly, this survey shows that voters do not want elected officials or courts redefining marriage and that the majority of the electorate supports traditional marriage in Minnesota. This should serve as a wake-up call to those seeking elected office that people feel strongly about marriage and any attempt to redefine marriage while bypassing a vote of the people will be met with electoral consequences.”