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Meetings set on Minneapolis search for historic places

Minneapolis officials are conducting historic surveys in the city and will hold the latest round of meetings next month to fill folks in about the project and get feedback.
The community meetings will provide details on the effort to find historic

Minneapolis officials are conducting historic surveys in the city and will hold the latest round of meetings next month to fill folks in about the project and get feedback.

The community meetings will provide details on the effort to find historic properties, themes and development patterns in these parts of the city:

  • The Camden Community Survey contains portions of Victory, Shingle Creek, Webber-Camden, Humboldt Industrial Area, Lind-Bohanon, and portions of Folwell, McKinley, and Cleveland neighborhoods
  • The Central Core Survey contains portions of St. Anthony West, Marcy Holmes, Como, Downtown West, Downtown East, Sumner Glenwood, and portions of Bryn Mawr, Harrison, Near North, North Loop, and Prospect Park neighborhoods
  • Windom, Kenny, and Armatage neighborhoods

The goal of the surveys is to identify unknown historic properties, recommend properties for further study, make informed decisions about the significance and protection of historic resources and develop goals and strategies for preservation as well as neighborhood planning.

Scheduled meetings are:

  • Camden Community Survey Area, Feb. 24, 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Webber Community Center: 4400 Dupont Avenue North, Minneapolis
  •  Central Core Survey Area, Feb. 17, 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.,  Our Lady of the Lourdes: 1 Lourdes Place, Minneapolis
  •  Downtown portion of Central Core Survey Area,  Feb. 28, 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.,  City Hall, Room 319
  •  Windom, Kenny, and Armatage Survey Area,  Feb. 23, 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.,  Kenny Recreation Center: 1328 58th Street W, Minneapolis

Officials say a 1970s survey of historic resources identified landmarks and historic districts, and the resurvey — started in 2001, and scheduled to be finished at the end of this year — was needed because of the aging of properties and changing attitudes about which types of historic resources need to be identified, such as historic landscapes, cultural and ethnic group resources.