Nonprofit, nonpartisan journalism. Supported by readers.

Donate
Topics

‘Biological warfare’ begins as officials release stingless wasps to control ash borers

The battle against ash borers that are killing trees in the Twin Cities will escalate Wednesday when state officials release stingless wasps, which kill ash borer eggs and larvae.
It’s biological warfare on the invasive beetle threatening ash trees

The battle against ash borers that are killing trees in the Twin Cities will escalate Wednesday when state officials release stingless wasps, which kill ash borer eggs and larvae.

It’s biological warfare on the invasive beetle threatening ash trees throughout North America. The state Department of Agriculture says it’s using biological control, or biocontrol, which pairs a pest species with natural enemies that restrict the pest population in its native range.

The two species of stingless wasps that will be released in St. Paul and Minneapolis were tested and approved by USDA for biocontrol, and they won’t harm humans or interfere with other species or harm the environment.

Reporters have been invited to attend the release of the wasps tomorrow in St. Paul at 10 a.m. at Langford Park.

Article continues after advertisement

They say: “Reporters will have an opportunity to release the stingless wasps.” So watch the news Wednesday to see if any do.