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Poll: Minnesotans tepid about Pawlenty and Bachmann presidential bids

A new poll shows Minnesotans don’t seem thrilled or honored that the state has two politicians prominently placed in the Republican presidential sweepstakes.
The Public Policy Polling survey of Minnesota voters says:
Only 28% think Pawlenty sho

A new poll shows Minnesotans don’t seem thrilled or honored that the state has two politicians prominently placed in the Republican presidential sweepstakes.

The Public Policy Polling survey of Minnesota voters says:

Only 28% think Pawlenty should seek the White House to 17% who think he should run for the Senate and 45% who think he shouldn’t run for anything. There’s even less interest in a Bachmann Presidential run — 14% think she should seek that office to 23% who think she should run for the Senate, 10% who think she should run for re-election to her House seat, and 47% who just want her to go away.

Pawlenty at least has some level of interest in his running for President from the party base — 57% of Republicans think he should run. GOP voters though would much rather Bachmann ran for the Senate (43% think she should do that) than President (which only 26% think she should aim for.) We’ll have numbers looking at how Pawlenty and Bachmann would do when matched against Amy Klobuchar and Barack Obama in the state over the next two days.

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Maybe the respondents were mad that Pawlenty made his official announcement in Iowa last month, and Bachmann plans to announce her plans later this month, also in Iowa.

The survey by the North Carolina polling firm was taken by calling 1,179 Minnesota voters from May 27-30, and the pollsters say there is a margin of error of +/-2.9 percent. They say it was not paid for or authorized by any campaign or political organization. PPP calls itself “a Democratic polling company,” but notes: “polling expert Nate Silver of the New York Times found that its surveys in 2010 actually exhibited a slight bias toward Republican candidates.”