Job vacancies in Minnesota hit 13-year high in second quarter

Minnesota employers had  84,700 job vacancies in the second quarter, the highest number since 2001, state officials said Thursday.

The number is up 16.7 percent from a year ago, according to the job vacancy survey from the state Department of Employment and Economic Development.

About 42 percent of the vacancies were for part-time work, and 16 percent were for temp or seasonal employment. Just over half of the vacancies, about 55 percent, were in the Twin Cities area.

The median wage offer was $12.05 an hour; 64 percent offered health insurance, officials said.

Said the state report:

Health care and social assistance had the most vacancies (19.3 percent of the total), followed by retail trade (14.8 percent), accommodation and food services (12.4 percent), manufacturing (8.2 percent) and educational services (8.1 percent).

Middle-sized firms (10 to 249 employees) accounted for 64.5 percent of the openings. Large firms (250 workers or more) had 22.8 percent of the vacancies. Small firms (fewer than 10 workers) had 12.7 percent of the vacancies.

Comments (3)

  1. Submitted by Paul Brandon on 10/09/2014 - 07:57 pm.

    Maybe

    if real wages had gone up in the past five years there would be fewer jobs that no one wants.
    You couldn’t support a family on the median wage.

  2. Submitted by Tom Anderson on 10/09/2014 - 09:32 pm.

    And the education required?

    “Health care and social assistance had the most vacancies (19.3 percent of the total), followed by retail trade (14.8 percent), accommodation and food services (12.4 percent), manufacturing (8.2 percent) and educational services (8.1 percent).”

    Seems like a person could apply for most of these with a high school degree unless “health care” includes doctors and nurses and “educational services” includes teachers. It seems like things are looking up although the median wage is down from a year ago.

    • Submitted by Paul Brandon on 10/10/2014 - 01:12 pm.

      One could certainly apply

      for these jobs (and probably perform them well) with a GED.
      The problem is that there are a lot of unemployed college grads out there competing for the same jobs.
      ‘Underemployment’ is one of our current economic problems.

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