Twins Notes: thumbs-up for Valencia, Mauer and Young, thumbs-down for Harris

• Beating up on the cellar-dwelling Orioles and Royals tends to make teams look good, but the Twins have won 10 of 14 to go from 4.5 games behind the White Sox to just one game back, despite playing that entire stretch minus Justin Morneau. Even without the AL’s second-best hitter for the past 18 games, the Twins now lead the league in batting average, rank second in on-base percentage, and are two runs from trailing only the Yankees and Red Sox in scoring.

Danny Valencia went 0-for-3 with a walk yesterday to snap an amazing hot streak that saw him go 14-for-19 (.737) during a four-game stretch. Phil Mackey of 1500ESPN.com looked it up and since 1993, the only players to rack up more than 14 hits in four games are Johnny Damon (2000), Mike Benjamin (1995), and Brett Butler (1995). Valencia is now hitting .387/.441/.495 in 30 games overall, after batting just .292/.347/.387 in 49 games at Triple-A before his call-up.

Obviously he’ll be coming back down to earth soon enough, and if you look beyond the flukishly high batting average, he hasn’t shown much pop with one homer and a .108 Isolated Power in 93 at-bats, but his 12-to-9 strikeout-to-walk ratio is a positive sign after Valencia struck out 71 times versus 22 walks at Triple-A, and his defense has been far better than I expected based on the not-so-positive reviews the Twins put out there last season and this spring.

• As noted previously in this space, I’ve heard rumblings for much of the season regarding Joe Mauer being more hurt (and with a wider variety of injuries) than he’s let on publicly, so it was interesting to read one of my favorite writers, Jeff Passan of Yahoo! Sports, tackle the topic in a column Wednesday. Passan predictably wasn’t able to get Mauer or anyone else to definitively comment on specific injuries, but it’s pretty clear that he’s very banged up physically.

Despite that, Mauer went 9-for-13 (.692) with a home run and four doubles in the three-game sweep of the Royals, including 5-for-5 with seven RBIs in Monday’s slaughtering. He passed up a chance for a sixth hit in the eighth inning, amusingly telling Ron Gardenhire, “No, I’m good.” It was the fourth five-hit game of his career, which ties Victor Martinez for the second-most of all time by a catcher. Hall of Famer Ernie Lombardi holds the record with six five-hit games.

Mauer is now 21-for-52 (.404) with two homers, nine doubles and 17 RBIs in a dozen games to begin the second half. He’s nowhere near last year’s MVP-winning numbers, but duplicating that historic performance was never likely anyway, and his current .310/.377/.465 line is, more or less, identical to his pre-2009 career mark of .317/.399/.457. In fact, it may be slightly better if you factor in the move to pitcher-friendly Target Field and scoring being down across MLB.

• Delmon Young is crushing the ball, and Matt Garza tossed a no-hitter Monday night against the Tigers, so the 2007 trade that sent Garza, Jason Bartlett, and Eduardo Morlan to Tampa Bay for Young, Brendan Harris, and Jason Pridie is suddenly a very popular topic again. Twins fans who’re rightfully excited about Young’s breakout won’t want to hear it, but the Rays are still clearly in the lead based on Wins Above Replacement since the Nov. 28, 2007, deal:

TWINS WAR RAYS WAR
Delmon Young +0.6 Matt Garza +7.6
Brendan Harris +0.2 Jason Bartlett +7.0
Jason Pridie -0.3 Eduardo Morlan 0.0
TOTAL +0.5 TOTAL +14.6

To put those numbers into some context, Mauerhas been worth 5.8 WAR per 150 games. So in terms of production and value received from the trade, the Rays have an edge of basically 2.5 seasons from Mauer. At the moment, the trade looks far less horrible for the Twins than it did in 2008 and 2009, but Young playing well for four months doesn’t wipe away his playing terribly for the previous two years or Garza and Bartlett both being huge contributors for the Rays.

Since the trade, Garza has 516 innings with a 3.89 ERA, which is better than any Twins starter in that time, and Bartlett has a .761 OPS that’s close to the .780 OPS from Young even without factoring in the huge defense/position gap. I’m thrilled that Young has figured things out, and the deal is starting to lean in the Twins’ favor, but let’s not get crazy with the hyperbole. Can’t we recognize his emergence without re-writing history and going completely over the top?

• Speaking of Harris, he’s hit just .238/.273/.386 with a hideous 23-to-3 strikeout-to-walk ratio in 27 games at Rochester since being dropped off the 40-man roster, passed through waivers unclaimed and demoted to Triple-A. He’s making $1.45 million this year and is still owed $1.75 million for 2011, so a return to Minnesota remains very possible at some point, but he’s looking more and more like a washed-up sunk cost. I’ll never understand why he got a multi-year deal.

• Earlier this week, I wrote about the negative impact outfield defense has had on the Twins’ pitching staff and Adam Peterson of Twinkie Town did some serious numbers-crunching to find that my analysis “appears to be correct.” He goes into a whole lot more depth than that, so if you’re into learning about the pitching-defense relationship, his work is worth checking out. Of course, if Jason Repko continues to start regularly in right field, that changes things quite a bit.

No comments yet

Leave a Reply