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Dayton appoints judge Natalie Hudson to Minnesota Supreme Court

MinnPost photo by Briana Bierschbach
Court of Appeals Judge Natalie Hudson will replace Associate Justice Alan Page, who will retire at the end of August after more than two decades on the court.

DFL Gov. Mark Dayton has appointed Court of Appeals Judge Natalie Hudson as a justice to the Minnesota Supreme Court, his third appointment to the state’s highest court as governor.

Hudson will replace Associate Justice Alan Page, who will retire at the end of August after more than two decades on the court. Hudson has served on the appeals court since 2002, after she was appointed by former Independence Party Gov. Jesse Ventura. Before her appointment, Hudson spent years as an attorney, focusing on employment and housing law, as well as St. Paul City attorney and assistant attorney general.

“During her distinguished 13-year tenure on the Court of Appeals, Judge Hudson has authored more than 1,100 written opinions, demonstrating clearly her unique aptitude for ruling on some of the most challenging legal issues facing our state today,” Dayton said.

Hudson was selected over two other finalists for the job, all women. Hudson will join two other women on the court, including Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, though Associate Justice Wilhelmina Wright will likely depart the court soon following confirmation to a federal judgeship. 

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Comments (2)

  1. Submitted by Dan Landherr on 08/19/2015 - 09:03 am.

    Glean writer had a softball here

    Dayton appointing Hudson seems right on Target

  2. Submitted by Frank Phelan on 08/19/2015 - 09:22 am.

    Balls & Strikes

    I really hope Hudson will be a judge who just “calls balls and strikes”, as John Roberts claimed he would do once he became the Chief Justice of SCOTUS. We don’t need any more of these activist judges who make law, such as in the cases of Bush V. Gore or Citizens United, where they ruled on parts of the law that neither party mentioned in their briefs.

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