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Minneapolis ‘trash house’ to be demolished

A two-story Minneapolis duplex is scheduled for demolition after nearly 18 months of complaints from neighbors.

Fourteen trash bins of material were removed last summer from this Sixth Street Northeast house.

With the owners’ acquiescence, a two-story Minneapolis duplex is scheduled for demolition after nearly 18 months of complaints from neighbors.

The property owners, listed as Alice and Brenda Leese, did not contest the order to demolish the building at 1126 Sixth St. NE. when it was considered Monday by City Council’s Zoning and Planning Committee.

In October 2010, the owners received a Director’s Order to Demolish but appealed, saying they wanted to have Habitat for Humanity renovate the dwelling. The owners were given an extension to explore renovation.

Then, in May 2011, the Fire Department was called to the property to investigate a “gas leak.” 

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What they found was a vacant dwelling with a number of unattended cats and an excessive amount of clutter.

The owners were given until July 2011 to clean out the building, but they again asked for more time.

Finally, last August, the city hired a contractor who removed 14 trash bins full of material from the building.

“It was severely contaminated with cat urine and cat feces,” according to Kellie Jones of Administrative Services, speaking for the city’s Inspections Department. Once the building was empty, further damage to floors, walls, ceilings and the roof was discovered.

Cost estimates range from $145,140 to $211,102 to renovate the property, which has a market value of about $195,000.

Demolition estimates ranges from $24,864 to $33,374. The demolition would take place in 60 to 90 days.

Two Cities blog, which covers Minneapolis and St. Paul City Halls, is made possible in part by grants from The Saint Paul Foundation and the Carolyn Foundation.